Living Well: Time to create meaningful New Year’s resolutions

The New Year is a time for reflection and a time to renew commitments to health.

  • Jan. 7, 2016 8:00 p.m.

The New Year is a time for reflection and a time to renew commitments to health. Many people find themselves feeling overwhelmed and exhausted after the holidays and feel a nagging sense that they should be embarking on a big new fitness plan or healthy eating plan. If better health is at the top of your list, go back to your inner drawing board. What do you need to change in your life so you can be your best self? What is standing in your way? Consider your physical well-being and your emotional well-being.

In our busy lives there are thousands of barriers getting in the way of making changes – a lack of money and time, long work hours, kids to care for and dogs to walk. Spend some time thinking about what is really important to you and what you can let go of. What do you need to do to take care of yourself, to feel relaxed and to be in a place where change is possible?

When you are ready, set realistic goals for the year that are SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely. For example, my resolution is to walk for 30 minutes, four days a week, until Easter. Notice how there is a specific activity, with measurable numbers in a timely fashion, and the goal appears to be fairly realistic and attainable for someone who maybe doesn’t get a lot of exercise, but is fully mobile.

If taking a big step feels like too much, here are a few small but SMART ideas that can have a big impact on your health.

· Walk to work on Mondays until spring solstice. Reassess your plan when the weather improves and the days are longer.

· Put your salt shaker in the garbage today. Extra salt contributes to high blood pressure.

· For the months of February and March, commit to packing your lunch each night before school or work, rather than in the morning when you are rushed.

· Make fish a standing item on your grocery list. Even canned tuna and salmon contain healthy omega three fats.

· Have media-free meals for a month.

Tara Starks is a public health dietitian with Interior Health

Just Posted

Trail military exercises provide crucial training

Exercise Sapper Crucible: ‘The nuts and bolts of what a soldier is’

VIDEO: SPCA ushers in new era with Castlegar facility

$2.69-million project had ribbon cutting on Friday

Thrums, Riondel, and Slocan, revisited

Place Names: Scottish author delighted by Thrums name origin

Last stand for Silver City summer

Fall officially arrives in Trail at 6:54 p.m. on Saturday

Tell the Times

Web Poll: Will you be attending a candidates forum in the Trail area?

VIDEO: SPCA ushers in new era with Castlegar facility

$2.69-million project had ribbon cutting on Friday

B.C. premier apologizes for removal of 1950s totem pole at Canada-U.S. border

First Nations say pole was raised at Peace Arch but removed to make way for tourism centre

Tornado touches down in Ottawa and Gatineau, Que.

Environment Canada says cars and homes have been damaged by severe thunderstorms and high wind gusts

An unexpected sight: Bear spotted eating another bear in central B.C.

Cheslatta Carrier Nation Chief finds bear eating another bear’s carcass

RCMP confirm death of missing BC teen Jessica Patrick

No details on cause were given. Case is under criminal investigation and police are asking for tips.

CUTENESS OVERLOAD: 2 sea otters hold hands at the Vancouver Aquarium

Holding hands is a common – and adorable – way for otters to stay safe in the water

B.C. teen with autism a talented guitarist

Farley Mifsud is gaining fans with every performance

Yukon man facing new attempted murder charge in B.C. exploding mail case

Leon Nepper, 73, is now facing one charge each of aggravated assault and attempted murder

B.C. man who left hospice to run in upcoming election dies

A week after leaving hospice to go to city hall to declare his candidacy, David Hesketh has died.

Most Read