A list of campaign promises in the British Columbia election

A list of campaign promises in the B.C. election

VANCOUVER — A look at some of the three main parties major promises in the B.C. election campaign:

Liberals:

— $157 million in new spending over three years.

— A personal income tax freeze and new tax credits for seniors and family members who care for them.

— Cut the small business tax to two per cent.

— Phase out provincial sales tax on electricity for all businesses.

— Four more balanced budgets, which would extend the string to nine straight budgets in the black.

— Cut unpopular medical service premiums in half, starting in January.

— Create a new tax credit for people living in communities that are dependent on BC Ferries.

— Teach coding to students in grades 6 to 9.

NDP:

— Reverse a Liberal tax cut for people earning more than $150,000 a year.

— Phase out medical service premiums and eliminate interest on student loans.

— Increase the corporate tax rate by one point to 12 per cent.

— Supports the Liberal plan to reduce the small business tax.

— Introduce a speculation tax that would apply to all out-of-province property owners. The two-per-cent tax on a property’s assessed value would give the government $200 million a year in additional revenue.

— Bring in $10-a-day childcare.

— Give renters an annual $400 rebate.

— Three years of balanced budgets, starting in this fiscal year.

Green party:

— Overhaul the tax system to pay for investments in childcare, education, public health and the environment.

— Operating deficits in the second and third years of a four-year mandate with a $216-million surplus in the final fiscal year.

— Create a new ministry for mental health and addictions.

— Earmark $80 million for mental health initiatives, including early intervention community centres, youth programs and more supervised injection sites.

— Spend $460-million investment in public transit infrastructure.

— Free daycare for working parents with kids under the age of three.

— Increase the corporate tax rate to 12 per cent, one percentage point higher than it is now.

— Raise tax rates on those who earn more than $108,000 a year and roll medical service premiums into payroll and income taxes.

The Canadian Press

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