In defense of carbon dioxide

Inappropriately named “green” government policies must be denounced

I heartily applaud the Trail Times for publishing the editorial cartoon entitled “Thousands of things we use everyday made from oil” (Trail Times, Nov. 22). With politicians encouraging the transition from hydrocarbon fuels to renewable energy, it is important we recognize the deprivations, if not the grinding poverty, we will have to endure in a carbon-free economy.

This energy transition is driven by the false narrative that we must fight climate change by restricting the generation of carbon dioxide (“CO2”) from hydrocarbon fuels (aka “fossil fuels” – coal, oil, and natural gas). Politicians fail to mention that Canada’s role would be meaningless simply because our share of the world’s CO2 (aka “carbon”) emissions is a meager 1.6 per cent.

Contrary to the climate-alarmist message, the benefits of adding CO2 to the atmosphere far outweigh any unproven climate risks. The sustainability of plant and animal life is critically dependent upon the availability of CO2 that is stored in the oceans and atmosphere.

It is well documented that the store of CO2 in ancient times was massive compared to the current, seriously-depleted store. What happened to all the planet’s CO2?

An examination of the planet’s carbon inventory reveals that most of the planet’s CO2 was consumed to form the sedimentary rocks (e.g. limestone) found in the Earth’s crust. The CO2 available to support carbon life forms was severely reduced (99.96 per cent) to a dangerously low level (atmospheric CO2 – 0.04 per cent).

This sequestration of CO2 is an ongoing process, which has the potential to terminate the planet’s Green Period.

The planet’s carbon inventory also reveals that CO2 emissions from all reserves of hydrocarbon fuels will not materially replenish the store of CO2. Unfortunately, the atmosphere will remain CO2 impoverished (0.04 per cent to 0.05 per cent).

Inappropriately named “green” government policies must be denounced because they are anti-green (i.e. anti-CO2). These policies have the capacity to destroy our modern lifestyle and the potential to be counter-productive in sustaining life on the planet.

Thorpe Watson, PhD

Warfield

Just Posted

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email it to editor@trailtimes.ca

Storm the Stairs and Trail Kidney Walk this weekend

Grapevine: Events in the Trail area for the week of Sept. 20 to Sept. 26

Kootenay Robusters end 18th paddling season

Women of Trail, Castlegar, Rossland, Christina Lake and Grand Forks came together in 2001

Military exercises may be audible in Trail

The exercises will be conducted in the Trail area from Thursday to Sunday

Council rollover inspires crop of hopeful politicians

Fourteen people vying for six council seats

Watch out for Pavement Patty: Drivers warned outside B.C. elementary school

New survey reveals unsafe school zones during 2018 back-to-school week

B.C. city moves to ban all retail marijiuana sales

New bylaw to public hearing on Oct. 2 in Pitt Meadows.

Tent city campers now allowed to stay in B.C. provincial park

Contrary to earlier reports, Ministry of Environment says there is no deadline for campers to leave Greater Victoria camp site

Former VP of lululemon joins B.C. cannabis cultivation facility

Kerry Biggs will be the Chief Financial Officer of True Leaf, in Lumby

Could cannabis help keep people in B.C. on treatment for opioid addiction?

People on opioid agonist treatment face lower risks of overdosing, BC Centre on Substance Use says

Around the BCHL – Trail Smoke Eater grad to captain NCAA Michigan Tech Huskies

Around the BCHL is a regular look at the BCHL and goings-on throughout the junior A world.

WHL season set to kick off in Cranbrook

Kootenay Ice gearing up for another campaign with youthful roster

Thieves escape after man claims his wife is giving birth

RCMP searching for suspects in brazen daytime break in

Rural Canada Post carriers could see 25-per-cent pay hike: spokesman

An arbitrator has released a ruling in a long-standing pay equity dispute at Canada Post

Most Read