Say ‘no’ to Internet censorship

"Under the TPP, Internet Service Providers would have the capability or responsibility to censor and monitor Internet usage..."

Key government officials and industry lobbyists are about to meet in secret in Salt Lake City, Utah, to hash out an Internet censorship plan that would make it possible for entire websites and families to be kicked off the Internet.

This plan is part of an international agreement called the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) that is being crafted in secret. Over 120,000 people have called on the heads of state of the 12 powerful countries to “Say No to Internet Censorship” in the TPP.

We each need to take a moment to spread the word in our community and to contact politicians who can voice our opposition.

I honestly wonder why such a plan is done in so secretive a manner. If the plan was one which would be beneficial for citizens of the countries taking part, you would think there would be no need for hiding the details.

Here’s a scary part of proposed changes. Experts claim that, under the TPP, “kids could be sent to jail for downloading” and whole families could be kicked off the internet.

Under the TPP, Internet Service Providers would have the capability or responsibility to censor and monitor Internet usage and remove entire websites from a person’s view.

Of course, in order to do that, ISPs would need to install costly invasive equipment. These added costs would result in larger bills for users.

The TPP is a U.S.-backed deal that will undermine Canada’s national rules which, when they were established in 2011, were considered a victory for creators and citizens.

If there are Internet users abusing the system there are procedures provided in those rules to deal with those problems.

There is no need to tar everyone with the same brush.

There’s little doubt that the proposed TPP will benefit  outdated media conglomerates at the expense of Canada’s present copyright laws.

It certainly is not a plan that will benefit those of us properly using the Internet in Canada. In all likelihood we’ll end up paying more and getting less.

Bob BastiaFruitvale

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