Strategic voting campaign is a myth

"'Strategic' voting is not at all a sure thing ... votes can shift suddenly".

For the past month the “need to vote strategically” has been trumpeted, culminating in a large ad in a local paper asserting that — in our riding — the “strategic” way to ensure a Conservative defeat is for Reds and Greens to bite the bullet and turn Orange.

Assertions in that ad, and by our riding’s Orange candidate, are based on outdated statistics gathered after the election in 2011, for a deceased riding. The new riding of South Okanagan-West Kootenay is a very different entity. Times have changed significantly, too.

After knocking on thousands of doors, Team Trudeau reports that the conservative element in the South Okanagan sector of the new riding is increasingly turning Red, out of disgust at Harper – while in West Kootenay those who once might have favoured the NDP are bewildered, to say the least, by Mulcair’s bolt across the spectrum into the land of the tight-fisted Blues.

“Strategic” voting is not at all a sure thing, in other words. Votes can shift suddenly. Polls have become notoriously unreliable, as the recent election in British Columbia demonstrated. Recent articles in the Huffington Post and Macleans have both made the point that past elections are not necessarily indicative of future results. Bryan Breguet of TooCloseToCall.ca, which analyzes public polling, advises, “Stop worrying about splitting the vote and simply cast your ballot for your first option.”

In Liberal Connie Denesiuk, we have a candidate who has travelled the riding exhaustively for the past 17 months, listening to people in coffee shops, around campfires, in hostels and shelters, and sleeping with the homeless under a bridge in Trail.

She has attended every public forum, and answered hundreds of letters.

And while I respect both her Orange and Green opponents, Connie is the one with the experience in governance and public administration to carry the needs of our new riding back to Ottawa.

Barbara Lambert

Penticton

Just Posted

Castlegar walk raises thousands for local Alzheimer’s support

Castle Wood Village fundraiser shows astounding support in community, organizers say

IRM reports small sulphuric acid leak at Waneta reload

IRM states a small volume of less than one cup and three dime-sized drips were leaked from carrier

Columbia Basin RDI: Exercise Your Right to Vote

Voter turnout statistics from the Columbia Basin Rural Development Institute

New farmers in Columbia Basin supported by land matching program

New and young farmers in the Basin are receiving support and services from a dedicated land matcher

Columbia Basin Trust offering business accelerator program

Trust seeking motivated companies for customized support and mentorship program

Video: Flyers new mascot ‘Gritty’ a bearded, googly-eyed terror

The Philadelphia Flyers unveiled their new mascot Monday, and as one would expect of the team that gave us the “Broad Street Bullies,” he’s far from cuddly.

Edmonton cannabis company revenues more than triples to $19.1 million

Aurora Cannabis revenues more than triple in fourth quarter

B.C. pharmacist suspended for giving drugs with human placenta

RCMP had samples of the seized substances tested by Health Canada

Seattle one step closer to NHL after arena plan approved

Seattle City Council unanimously approved plans for a privately funded $700 million renovation of KeyArena

Harvest Moon to light up B.C. skies with an ‘autumn hue’

It’s the first moon after the autumn equinox

Hockey league gets $1.4M for assistance program after Humboldt Broncos crash

Program will help players, families, coaches and volunteers after the shock of the deadly crash

Canada has removed six out of 900 asylum seekers already facing U.S. deportation

Ottawa had said the ‘overwhelming majority’ had been removed

Appeal pipeline decision but consult Indigenous communities, Scheer says

The federal appeals court halted the Trans Mountain expansion last month

Most Read