Views of Lower Arrow Lake as seen from the Columbia and Western Railway trail between Castlegar and Paulson. You can ride on the trail on Aug. 15 as part of a fundraiser for Our Daily Bread.

Tenth annual Pedal Along a Rail Trail coming

It's not to late to register for the mountain bike ride that travels on the Columbia and Western Railway trail from Paulson to Castlegar.

If you love the outdoors, cycling, and would like to help those in need, it’s time to register for the 10th annual Pedal Along a Rail Trail (P.A.R.T 10) which travels on the Columbia and Western Railway on Saturday, Aug. 15.

The 64 km route takes mountain bikers along the old Canadian Pacific rail line from the Paulson Detour Road to the Celgar mill parking lot near Castlegar. It is an incredibly scenic four-to-five hour ride with trestles, tunnels, and spectacular views from high above Arrow Lake.

The McCormick Creek trestle. Greg Nesteroff photo

Pastor Jim Reimer, of Kootenay Christian Fellowship said ride is “absolutely phenomenal,” praising the scenery, as well as the historical memorial to Doukhobor leader Peter (Lordly) Verigin who was among nine people killed when the train he was riding mysteriously blew up in 1924.

There are four tunnels — the largest of which is curved and at nearly one kilometre long leaves people in complete darkness.

“It’s worth it just for that,” said Reimer. “Just to see the engineering. They started digging the tunnel on either side and managed to meet in the middle.”

Reimer has participated in the ride several times and emphasizes that it’s a ride, not a race.

“We want to people to enjoy the ride,” he said.

The first seven kilometres is a gentle uphill with a friendly 2.5 per cent grade and after that, it’s all downhill. Riders are treated to a healthy meal at the end.

Reimer said it’s a great cause as well as the annual fundraiser averages $10,000 each year. The entry fee covers the shuttle costs but he hopes folks are inspired to find sponsors as a fundraiser to support Our Daily Bread,  Nelson’s only hot lunch program, which operates five days a week from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and serves more than 90 people.

“Many of our guests are homeless, at risk of homelessness, seniors, mentally ill or are among the working poor,” said Reimer. “The meal we provide is often the only meal they will eat for the day.”

Transportation is provided,with a bike shuttle pick up at one of two locations:

•    Kootenay Christian Fellowship parking lot, 520 Falls St. in Nelson at 7 a.m.

•    1801 Connors Road (Castlegar Christian Fellowship) in Castlegar at 8:15 a.m.

A support vehicle will travel with the group in the event anyone needs help but riders should bring water, snacks, a lunch, and a light for the tunnel. Helmets are mandatory. At the end of the ride, a hot meal will be provided as part of the $70 registration fee.

If you prefer, you can raise pledges for Our Daily Bread. If you raise $125 or more, your registration fee will be waived.

For more information about the ride or to register, contact 1-888-761-3301 or office@kcfoffice.com. Registrations can also be found online at kootenaychristianfellowship.com. Space is limited and the registration deadline is Aug. 10.

For more information on Our Daily Bread, go to kootenaychristianfellowship.com/odb.html, or stop in for lunch and see Our Daily Bread’s success.

Just Posted

Kootenay employers ready to meet job seekers at Black Press career fair

Dozens of companies will attend the event on Nov. 15 at the Ktunaxa Nation Building in Cranbrook

Sandblasting Silver City skate sign

The Trail Sk8 Park was closed on Thursday so workers could ready a sign for painting

Trail vet says voting system has worked for 150 years

Letter to the Editor from Vaughn Budd of Trail

Area A seeks views on cannabis rules

The public hearing for Area A residents will go Tuesday, Nov. 13 at 5 p.m.

Trail liquor store held up Friday night

The perpetrator was brandishing a weapon that appeared to be a gun, according to the Trail RCMP

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Feds pledge money for young scientists, but funding for in-house research slips

Canada’s spending on science is up almost 10 per cent since the Liberals took office, but spending on in-house research is actually down

Disabled boy has ‘forgiven’ bullies who walked on him in stream, mom says

A Cape Breton teen who has cerebral palsy was told to lie in a stream as other kids walked over him

Letters shed light on state of mind of B.C. mom accused of daughter’s murder

Trial of South Surrey mother Lisa Batstone begins in BC Supreme Court

Vancouver man must pay $22,000 after breaking strata rules

Peter Gordon took his fight over his rented condo to the civil resolution tribunal, but lost

B.C. cheese linked to 5 E. coli cases

People are asked to throw out or return ‘Qualicum Spice’ cheese

Canada Post no longer guarantees delivery times amid more rotating strikes

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers closed two major processing centres in Ontario and B.C.

B.C. city councillor resigns as AutismBC director amid SOGI controversy

AutismBC president Gary Robins says Laurie Guerra’s resignation is effective Nov. 12

Most Read