FILE - In this Dec. 17, 2019, file photo, Tahsha Sydnor stows packages into special containers after Amazon robots deliver separated packages by zip code at an Amazon warehouse facility in Goodyear, Ariz. On Tuesday, Mar. 17, 2020, Amazon said it will limit what suppliers can send to its warehouses for the next three weeks amid COVID-19. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

More wipes, no jeans: Amazon limits shipments to warehouses

Suppliers not allowed to send non-essentials like jeans, phone cases to warehouses for three weeks

Amazon, in an attempt to fill its warehouses with toilet paper, hand sanitizer and other items in high demand, said Tuesday that it will limit what suppliers can send to its warehouses for the next three weeks.

Among the items that suppliers and third-party sellers can ship to Amazon include canned beans, diapers, dog food, disinfecting wipes, medical supplies and household goods. Items like jeans, phone cases and other non-essentials will not be allowed.

Suppliers and third-party sellers send their products to Amazon’s warehouses to store until a shopper goes online and clicks buy. Amazon then packs up the products and ships it to customers.

ALSO READ: Amazon seeks to hire 100,000 to keep up with surge in orders

The new restrictions are another sign of how much pressure Amazon’s delivery network is facing as more people stay home and shop online as the coronavirus spreads in the U.S.

The Seattle-based company warned customers this week that deliveries may take longer than usual and some household goods would be sold out. And on Monday the company said it will add 100,000 new jobs at delivery centres and its warehouses to keep up with a spike in orders.

Amazon said the new restrictions will last until April 5. It applies to large vendors as well as third-party sellers, who list items to sell on Amazon.com directly.

It’s still unclear what affect it will have on shoppers. For now, they will be able to buy other products like clothing and accessories that are already stored in warehouses and available on its site.

Joseph Pisani, The Associated Press

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