The Le Roi Community Foundation awards grants to other registered charities for projects that benefit the communities of Fruitvale, Montrose, Rossland, Trail, Warfield, and Areas A and B. The foundation supports: arts and culture; education; environment; health and welfare; sports and recreation. Photo: LeRoiFoundation.com

The Le Roi Community Foundation awards grants to other registered charities for projects that benefit the communities of Fruitvale, Montrose, Rossland, Trail, Warfield, and Areas A and B. The foundation supports: arts and culture; education; environment; health and welfare; sports and recreation. Photo: LeRoiFoundation.com

Applications for community recovery funds open in January

For more information visit: communityservicesrecoveryfund.ca

Earlier this month, the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Karina Gould, announced that Community Foundations of Canada alongside Canadian Red Cross and United Way Centraide Canada have been selected to distribute funding to help a broad and diverse range of charities, nonprofits and Indigenous Governing Bodies.

Funds will help these organizations adapt and modernize, so they can support pandemic recovery in communities across Canada.

“Charities and non-profits are at the forefront of addressing communities’ needs, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Heather Brandvold, director, designated grants committee chair, Le Roi Community Foundation. “However, many of them are struggling to recover and adapt their services to the changing needs of the Greater Trail and district communities.”

The Community Services Recovery Fund is a one-time investment of $400 million that will help these groups acquire the tools they need to adapt and modernize so they can better support pandemic recovery in communities across Canada.

Brandvold adds, “Through the Community Services Recovery Fund, Trail Rossland, Montrose, Fruitvale and Areas A and B will be able to give organizations the support they need to serve our community.”

Since the early phases of the pandemic, charities, nonprofits and Indigenous Governing Bodies have struggled with increased demand for their services, reduced revenues, declines in charitable giving due to the rising cost of living, and a greater need to make use of digital tools as part of adapting and modernizing their operations.

Money from the Community Services Recovery Fund enables charities, nonprofits and Indigenous Governing Bodies to invest in their own organizational capacity.

These investments include: adapting the way they deliver services to support the needs of their staff and volunteers; buying equipment such as computers and software; creating new ways of working, such as developing new fundraising approaches; providing support for staff and volunteers, such as staff training, supports for mental health and well-being; and developing plans to receive funding from diverse sources.

As a result of the investments provided by the Community Services Recovery Fund, charities, nonprofits and Indigenous Governing Bodies will be better equipped to improve the efficacy, accessibility, and sustainability of the community services that they provide.

The application process launches next month on Jan. 6.

For more information visit: communityservicesrecoveryfund.ca.

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