Author Dorje Dolma presents her book Yak Girl next week at the Rossland Public Library.

Author brings a touch of Nepal to Rossland

Yak Girl tells the story of growing up in the Himalayas, caring for family and livestock.

In a remote region of Nepal, at an altitude of 13,000 feet, a community ekes out an existence against a backdrop of breathtaking beauty.

It’s a place most of us will never see, but we can catch a glimpse of it this month.

Author Dorje Dolma presents her book Yak Girl: Growing Up in the Remote Dolpo Region of Nepal at a special presentation on Wednesday, Jan. 30 at the Rossland Public Library.

The multimedia presentation starts at 7 p.m. and is accompanied by portraits from the village by photographer David R. Gluns.

The outside world knew little of the Dolpo region when, in the 1980s, celebrated travel writer Peter Matthiessen described life there in The Snow Leopard.

At the time, Dolpo had no running water, electricity, motor vehicles, phones, school, or doctors. This is where the author grew up, caring for her many siblings and the family’s sheep, goats, and yaks — even defending them from snow leopards.

Yak Girl describes the author’s life in what one review called “a vivid testimony of growing up and learning to survive in a harsh, rugged, yet astonishingly beautiful land.”

Included in Dolma’s story is a perilous, month-long trek to Kathmandu with her parents to meet the westerners who would take her to the U.S. for the surgery that would save her life.

Dolma was eventually adopted by her new American family; she graduated from university and became an early childhood educator before undertaking this, her first book.

Dolma’sbok tour includes a presentation at Selkirk College’s Mir Centre for Peace in Castlegar on Thursday, Jan. 31 at 11 a.m., and anotehr stop the same day at the Nelson Library at 7 p.m.

On Feb. 4, the Civic Theatre in Nelson will show the documentary The Only Son, which follows Dolma’s brother Pema and his family in their struggle to preserve a culture.

The tour is sponsored by the Altitude Project, a non-profit registered charity which sponsors education, health and infrastructure projects in the Upper Dolpo region of Nepal.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Trail starts water conservation Monday

Restrictions part of municipal commitment to lower water demand

Horoscopes for the week of May 26

Weekly horoscopes by Morgan Fava

COVID-19: Business Check-In

The application process for certain programs has not been smooth.

Nakusp RCMP seize large quantity of drugs during seach warrant on May 27

The warrant was conducted in the 300th block of 8th Avenue NW

Possible Kermode Bear spotted near Castlegar

A local resident spotted the white-coloured bear while on an evening trail run on May 27

Mission prison COVID-19 outbreak ends, 9 new cases in B.C.

New positive test at Port Coquitlam care home

Man who bound, murdered Vancouver Island teen still a risk to public: parole board

Kimberly Proctor’s killer is still ‘mismanaging emotions,’ has had ‘temper tantrums’

VIDEO: Humpback whales put on quite a show

The ‘playful’ pod lingered by a Campbell River tour operator’s boat for quite some time

Getting hitched at historic B.C. gold rush town still on table during COVID-19 pandemic

Micro-weddings, online visits, offered at Barkerville Historic Town and Park

Revelstoke woman finds welcoming letter on her Alberta-registered truck

There have been multiple reports online of vandalism to vehicles with Alberta licence plates

B.C. businesses ‘can’t shoulder burden’ of COVID-19 sick pay

Trudeau’s plan should be tied to federal emergency aid

B.C. teacher reprimanded for sharing homophobic and sexist memes, making racist comments

Klaus Hardy Breslauer was accused of making a laundry list of concerning decisions as a science teacher

COVID-19: B.C. too dependent on foreign food production workers

New B.C. job site links unemployed with farm, seafood work

Another Asian giant ‘murder hornet’ found in Lower Mainland

This is the farthest east the invasive species has been found so far

Most Read