North Jubliee wetland project considered

Public support is being sought for the project and a public information meeting will be held on Tuesday, September 30

People gather at the site of the proposed North Jubilee wetland project at the 2014 Wetland Keepers Workshop hosted by the BC Wildlife Federation

The City of Rossland will be considering rehabilitating a wetland site located at North Jubilee Park.  Public support is being sought for the project and a public information meeting will be held on Tuesday, September 30 at 6 p.m. at the Miners’ Hall.  If approved, construction will start in September 2015.  The pre-existing stream and wetland has been drained and managed as a park for 65 years.

Rossland residents Rachael Roussin and Eva Cameron have presented the city with a proposal to embrace the water and were permitted to proceed with a feasibility study.  The two have experience in wetland rehabilitation and have used their expertise to come up with a management plan for the city. It will ultimately be up to the city to decide whether they want to adopt the idea with the support of the public.  The city will be responsible for the making and maintenance of the project.

The proposal involves digging out three small wetland pools with an excavator.  The pools would be shallow, around knee height and 20 metres across.  Public areas and pathways would be constructed and maintained by the city. The creation of these wetland pools would enable the ground around it to stay dry and the city to do better maintenance of the park area.

The city attempts to manage North Jubilee Park but the area remains wet.  The uneven ground allows one to two inches of water to pool there for most of the year.  The current drainage system in place is not equipped to keep the area dry, which is another reason why the project would be beneficial for the space.

The wetland rehabilitation project intends to improve the park for the use of the public.  The area is inherently wet with organic soils that produce aquatic plants and provide a habitat for wildlife such as frogs and killdeer birds, which nest in the long grass every spring.  This presents an incredible educational opportunity for the school.  The site can be used as an outdoor classroom for children to not only learn about wetlands, their habitat and ecosystems but to visit them on a regular basis.

With the implementation of the wetlands, North Jubilee will become a natural watershed protection area.  It will capture any surface runoff, reducing the amount in the spring.  The water will filter naturally before it flows downstream.  Another benefit is that it would provide a habitat for mosquito predators and reduce the amount of mosquitos in the area.

Residents in the area have taken a strong interest in the project and said they can hear the frogs sometimes.  Roussin explains that most of the neighbours have a general concern for the animals.

Roussin commented, “It’s amazing how much wildlife is there that you wouldn’t notice.”

Roussin and Cameron believe that rehabilitating the wetland site is a good management option for the city and would improve the area for public use.  They encourage residents to come to the information meeting to learn more about the advantages of restoring the wetland.

 

Just Posted

Trail area homicide investigation continues

Jan. 14 marked one year since Jordan Workman was discovered in the trunk of a burnt car

Outbreak prompts advisory for visitors to extended care wing in Trail hospital

A respiratory infection has been active in Poplar Ridge Pavilion since Monday, advises IH

RDCK moves ahead with Castlegar rec complex upgrade plan

Board approves grant application for $13 million from provincial, federal governments

Construction of a Trail bridge underway

This link is seen as a way to enhance programming and better use every inch of the new facility

Music on stage at the Rossland Legion, Sunday

Grapevine: List of events in Trail and Greater Area for the week of Jan. 17 to Jan. 23

B.C. opioid crisis to get same world-renowned treatment approach as HIV/AIDS

A program that focuses on treatment as prevention will roll out Jan. 17

Olympian snowboarder Max Parrot diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma

Each year in Canada, approximately 900 people are diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma

‘Prince of Pot’ Marc Emery accused of sexual assault, harassment

Emery denied the allegations, but a Toronto woman says she is not the only one speaking out

Vancouver Island photographer makes National Geographic’s 2018 elite

Rare double honour for Marston from the 36 best Your Shots out of nearly 19,000 photos

Ex-Liberal candidate in Burnaby, B.C., says volunteer wrote controversial post

Karen Wang dropped out following online post singling out NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh’s ethnicity

Asteroids are smacking Earth twice as often as before

The team counted 29 craters that were no older than 290 million years

Canada’s arrest of Huawei exec an act of ‘backstabbing,’ Chinese ambassador says

China has called Canada’s arrest of Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou ‘politically motivated’

BREAKING: Jury finds man accused of killing B.C. girl, 12, guilty

Twelve-year-old Monica Jack disappeared in May 1978 while riding her bike along a highway in Merritt, B.C.

B.C. government extends coastal log export rules for six months

Premier John Horgan promises reform at loggers’ convention

Most Read