The Triangle Gardens trailer court in Grand Forks perpetuates the name of a nursery started in 1937. Greg Nesteroff photo

Grand Forks grew with new subdivisions, townsites

Place Names: Grand Forks neighbourhoods, Part 4

A series on West Kootenay/Boundary place names

We conclude our look at Grand Forks neighbourhoods by studying some little-known additions and newer subdivisions.

• Van Ness Addition: This area by Evergreen Cemetery was first mentioned in the Midway Advance of March 23, 1896, which noted John A. Coryell had finished surveying it.

The east-west streets were Clinton (now Donaldson Drive), Indiana (now 68th), Ontario (67th), Elgin (66th), Mill (which no longer exists), and Aberdeen (which is within the cemetery and no longer exists). The north-west streets were Main (now 14th), Nelson (which no longer exists), and Riverside (approximately Kettle River Drive today).

The addition’s name honored hotelier Charles Van Ness (1859-99) and is perpetuated in nearby Van-Ness Way.

• McCarren’s Addition: The Grand Forks Miner of April 24, 1897 reported: “Two new additions to Grand Forks have been recently surveyed and will be placed on the market shortly. The first consists of 40 acres just across the Kettle river, and is now being platted out into town lots, as Ruckce’s [sic] addition, by L.A. Manly and Richard McCarren.”

That should have read Ruckle’s Addition, which we’ve previously covered in this series. The story went on: “The second, owned by the same parties, consists of 60-acre lots on McCarren’s farm about two miles west of town.”

McCarren (1867-?) received a Crown grant in 1897 for Lot 700, due west of the original townsite. His addition probably accounted for Observation (today’s 8th), Cambridge (9th), Oxford (10th), and Miner (11th) streets.

• East Addition: Surveyed in 1896 by Coryell, although its exact boundaries are unclear.

• North Addition: The Vancouver Daily World of May 14, 1897 reported: “The demand for city property has been such that the townsite company has found it necessary to plat a new addition, and ‘North addition,’ lying between Observation Mountain and the North Fork of Kettle River has been laid off into town lots …”

North Addition is today’s Riverside Drive neighbourhood, between 77th and 85th avenues.

• Smelter Addition: Surveyed by Rossland’s Frank Deveraux, and first mentioned in the Grand Forks Miner on Oct. 9, 1897. It’s no longer on the map, but the huge slag piles of the Granby smelter are still visible from Riverside Drive.

• Triangle Gardens: Area around the present RCMP station, named by R.E. (Dick) Scott, who established a nursery there in March 1937. The name possibly reflects the triangle created by Highway 3 on the north, Boundary Drive on the east, and the former railway line on the south and west. The name is perpetuated by the Triangle Gardens trailer court at 7225 Boundary Dr.

• Weston, Cuprum: Both railway stops we’ve previously covered, in or near city limits. Weston was one mile west of the Great Northern’s Grand Forks station and was named in 1905. The yard and passenger station ceased to exist in 1930, by which time the name was already fading out.

Cuprum was the depot in the Ruckle neighbourhood where the CPR’s Boundary and North Fork subdivisions met. Cuprum is the Latin term for copper. The name was used from at least 1918 to 1928. Later it was just known as the Big Y.

• Valley Heights: A newer subdivision on the east side of the Granby River, developed since the early 1980s. Streets include Valley Heights Drive, Wellington Crescent, Victoria Way, Golden Way, and Winnipeg Avenue. (Central Avenue, through which Highway 3 now passes, was known as Winnipeg Avenue until 1962.)

• Copper Ridge Estates: Developed since the 1990s, this subdivision on the east side of North Fork Road northwest of the city is named after the Boundary’s chief mineral resource. Its streets are Prospect Drive, Nugget Place and Placer Place.

• Eagle Ridge Estates: Developed since the 1980s on the west side of North Fork Road, a little north of Copper Ridge. Its streets are Eagle Ridge, Hairsine, Silver Tip, and Big Horn.

GROSVENOR, REVISITED

A recent installment in this series speculated that the Castlegar neighbourhood of Grosvenor, in upper Kinnaird, might have been named after a pioneer family.

Not so, reveals Barb Kinakin, who lives there. In fact, her late father chose the name when he developed the subdivision in the early 1980s. For some reason, the city told him they wanted the name to start with an F or a G. Mary Anderson, a local real estate agent from England, suggested Grosvenor, a popular place name in the UK.

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Van-Ness Way in Grand Forks is named for Charles Van Ness, a hotelkeeper who had the Van Ness townsite addition surveyed near Evergreen cemetery. Greg Nesteroff photo

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