A freedom-of-information request has revealed a list of creative dog names in the City of White Rock. (File photo)

Pug life: B.C. town boasts waggish list of dog names

Freedom-of-information request lists most ‘pupular’ dog names registered in White Rock

When selecting a name for a dog, perhaps a wise move would be to visualize yourself shouting for the animal in a crowded park.

Or, maybe the owners of Jugz, a White Rock pug, didn’t mind the potential faux-paw.

Jugz is just one of a number of waggish names dog owners came up with in the City of White Rock.

Other names that would pawisbly make one howl include a husky named Haggis MacDuff, a bulldog named Nacho, a miniature pinscher named Mylie Cyrus, a rottweiler named Einstein, a Maremma sheepdog named Miss Kitty, a border collie named Jitterbug, a whippet named Marsha B. Mellow, and a dachshund named Peter Parker – clearly a missed opportunity for Peter Barker.

There is also a golden retriever registered in the city named Santa – one can only assume his last name is Paws.

READ ALSO: White Rock dog poop conspiracy picks up steam

READ ALSO: White Rock bylaw increasing dog patrols on promenade

The dog names are listed on a freedom-of-information request recently released by the City of White Rock. The FOI request fetched more than 800 names, with the most pawpular being Charlie, Coco, Bella, Lucy and Maggie.

Labrador breeds appear most frequently on the list, with about 95 registered, then poodles with 48, terriers with 45, shih tzus, 36, collies and chihuahuas with 32 each, golden retrievers, 29, pitbulls and German shepherds with 20 each and rottweilers with 10.

The list also identifies four dogs that have been classified as dangerous by the city.

A dog is classified as dangerous in the city after it has bitten a person or animal, has aggressively pursued a person or animal, or has been found to be dangerous or aggressive by bylaw animal control officers.

Dogs determined to be aggressive include a bulldog named Forrest, a great Dane cross named Maggie, a Labrador retriever cross named Mungo, and a presa canario named Sunny.



aaron.hinks@peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Market and music tonight at Gyro Park

Grapevine: Local events from July 18 to July 24

Fort Shepherd restrictions unchanged after public meeting

TLC held an informational session in Trail on Monday

Last stop: The inside story of Queen City Shuttle and Charters’ closure

Former employees open up about the Nelson company’s final days

Avoid vacation vehicle woes

Ron Nutini is a licensed automotive technician in Trail

How the Queen City Shuttle and Charters’ closure affected you

Here’s what readers had to say about the company’s shutdown

Rents in most Canadian cities are unaffordable for lower-income earners: study

Roughly one-third of households, or 4.7 million, are renters

Rare white ravens spotted again on Vancouver Island

Nature photographer Mike Yip said mysterious birds back in Coombs area

Motor vehicle incident in Sparwood results in death of dump truck driver

Authorities did not specify what caused the vehicle to go off the road.

B.C. government seeks advice on reviving Interior forest industry

Public website opens as meetings start with community leaders

Psychics, drones being used to search for missing Chilliwack woman with dementia

Drones, psychics, dogs and more have been employed to help find Grace Baranyk, 86

Kootenay Anglican bishops, priests grapple with same-sex marriage vote

After same-sex marriage amendment rejection, priests, bishops voice discontent

Feds issue battery technology challenge at energy conference in Cranbrook

Provincial and territorial energy and mines ministers talk policy, challenges at annual meeting

B.C. mom to go to Europe court in hopes of getting alleged abducted daughter back

Tasha Brown alleges her estranged wife abducted their daughter Kaydance Etchells in 2016

‘Benzos’ and fentanyl a deadly cocktail causing a growing concern on B.C. streets

Overdoses caused by benzodiazepines can’t be reversed with opioid-overdose antidote naloxone

Most Read