Forty seven years ago, a group of 12 Trail teens broke a world record for non-stop continuous shinny played. Photo: Trail Historical Society

Forty seven years ago, a group of 12 Trail teens broke a world record for non-stop continuous shinny played. Photo: Trail Historical Society

Trail Blazers: Teenagers play the longest shinny game ever

The record breaking feat took place over 16 hours in a City of Trail park on Oct. 26, 1974

Here’s a record-remarkable look back in time.

Forty seven years ago, a group of 12 Trail teens broke a world record for non-stop continuous shinny played.

Moreover, after scanning several hundred “longest” records on GuinnessWorldRecords.com and not finding anything to the contrary, the Trail Times is going out on a limb to say this Silver City feat from 1974 still stands.

It all began that year when the teenagers read an article published in the Trail Daily Times noting a group of Ontario girls who played a continuous game of shinny for 14 hours, two minutes.

“Not to be outdone, this group of young men were up to the challenge,” notes Sarah Benson-Lord, Trail Museum and Archives manager.

Beginning at 5 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26, 1974, the boys beat that record by over one hour at Glenmerry park.

Clocking 16 hours, fueled by coffee and monitored by Dr. Nick Schmitt, the game wrapped up at 9 p.m.

Made up of two teams — the Superstars and the All-Stars — the final tally was 369 to 302 respectively.

Participating in the record-breaking game were, front row, L-R: James Beamish, Ron Dimock, Anne Birukow (scorekeeper), Mario Lioce and Murray Gilchrist. Back row, L-R: Pat Healey, Gordon McLeod, Gordon Brown, Mike Schmitt, David Bay, Glen White, Ron Burgan and Dale Glover.

Tip: To read more Trail Blazers stories click on the “Local History” tag on the bottom of this story.

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