Trail family celebrates 75 years of Korpack Cement Products

Old company photo of the block plant crew - featuring from left, Florence Ferraro Nesmith (aunt), Tony Ferraro (grandfather), Eddie Ferraro Sr (father), unknown employees front left and middle, Elmo Ferraro (uncle). (Photo courtesy of Nick Ferraro)Old company photo of the block plant crew - featuring from left, Florence Ferraro Nesmith (aunt), Tony Ferraro (grandfather), Eddie Ferraro Sr (father), unknown employees front left and middle, Elmo Ferraro (uncle). (Photo courtesy of Nick Ferraro)
Old company photo of the block plant crew - featuring left to right, Florence Ferraro Nesmith (aunt), Tony Ferraro (grandfather), Eddie Ferraro Sr (father), unknown employees front left and middle, Elmo Ferraro (uncle) (Photo courtesy of Nick Ferraro)

There is little more fulfilling than being able to create a family business that lasts multiple generations and becomes a local favourite in the process – but that’s what the Ferraro family’s cement company has achieved.

Korpack Cement Products turned 75 on March 13. Meanwhile, owner Eddie Jr. Ferraro will soon be celebrating 45 years with company since he joined the family business when hwas just 16 years old.

Korpack was originally founded in 1947 by three members of the Ferraro family: Eddie’s grandfather Tony Ferraro, his uncle Elmo Ferraro, and his father Eddie Sr. Ferraro.

Korpack block plant crew hand piling block from the days production run - 3,000 40-pound blocks every day. (Photo courtesy of Nick Ferraro)

Korpack block plant crew hand piling block from the days production run - 3,000 40-pound blocks every day. (Photo courtesy of Nick Ferraro)

Tony immigrated from Italy and launched Ferraro Brothers Sand and Gravel, which would become a precursor to the longtime cement company.

According to Eddie Jr., after the Second World War it was challenging to carry their Italian-Canadian heritage through the business so instead of a namesake titled company, the family went with the name Korpack – inspired by the purchase of their first masonry block from a company in Spokane, Wash.

“In the beginning, we owned gravel pits and would use that to make different kinds of gravel products. We then formed Korpack to use some of the gravel we were producing in the masonry-block business,” Eddie Jr. said.

The business focuses on patios and driveways, but also commercial and industrial-grade projects for buildings and roadways.

Korpack is also no stranger to giving back to the community, especially with restoration efforts after natural disasters.

“I vaguely remember, when I was very young, the flood that came through trail in the 60s, my dad and uncle had to work long hours to help with that.” Eddie Jr. said.

“Recently, as well, [during] the flood in Trail from the early 90s, we worked for 20 hours straight. Our operation was like a beehive with the way people were taking sand to help, it was a very busy day.”

One of Eddie Jr.’s fondest memories, though, comes in the form of a long, hard day during a contract for the Celgar Pulp Mill.

“That project ended up being our biggest concrete pour to date. After a hard 10 hour day, I can still remember the satisfaction I got after we did such a great job.”

BusinessCity of TrailLocal History