Makers of ‘A Dog’s Journey’ feel vindicated as sequel nears

“A Dog’s Purpose” was marred by accusations of animal abuse

FILE - In this April 3, 2019, file photo, Dennis Quaid, left, a cast member in the upcoming film “A Dog’s Journey,” attends to his dog as the film’s director Gail Mancuso looks on during the Universal Pictures presentation at CinemaCon 2019, the official convention of the National Association of Theatre Owners (NATO) at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The 2018 family hit ‚ÄúA Dog‚Äôs Purpose‚Äù was marred by accusations of animal abuse after a video of a frightened dog that appeared to be forced into rushing water during the making of the film was posted by TMZ. Quaid starred in both movies (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

The 2017 family movie “A Dog’s Purpose” was marred by accusations of animal abuse after a video of a frightened dog that appeared to be forced into rushing water during the making of the film was posted by TMZ.

The footage quickly went viral but a third-party investigation discounted the allegations. On Thursday, those involved in the film reflected on the controversy at the premiere of the film’s sequel, “A Dog’s Journey.”

American Humane has said its investigation showed no dogs were harmed but acknowledged the dog was in distress and production staff should have realized that earlier.

Dennis Quaid, the star of both movies, said: “I think we were really vindicated in that.”

READ MORE: Big brother, big winner: Kelowna local wins reality TV show

PETA maintained that an animal was terrorized during the movie in a statement to The Associated Press on Friday.

Michael Cidoni Lennox, The Associated Press

READ MORE: MTV launches ‘Save Our Moms’ campaign to combat mortality

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Market and music tonight at Gyro Park

Grapevine: Local events from July 18 to July 24

Fort Shepherd restrictions unchanged after public meeting

TLC held an informational session in Trail on Monday

Last stop: The inside story of Queen City Shuttle and Charters’ closure

Former employees open up about the Nelson company’s final days

Avoid vacation vehicle woes

Ron Nutini is a licensed automotive technician in Trail

How the Queen City Shuttle and Charters’ closure affected you

Here’s what readers had to say about the company’s shutdown

Rents in most Canadian cities are unaffordable for lower-income earners: study

Roughly one-third of households, or 4.7 million, are renters

B.C. government seeks advice on reviving Interior forest industry

Public website opens as meetings start with community leaders

Psychics, drones being used to search for missing Chilliwack woman with dementia

Drones, psychics, dogs and more have been employed to help find Grace Baranyk, 86

Kootenay Anglican bishops, priests grapple with same-sex marriage vote

After same-sex marriage amendment rejection, priests, bishops voice discontent

Feds issue battery technology challenge at energy conference in Cranbrook

Provincial and territorial energy and mines ministers talk policy, challenges at annual meeting

B.C. mom to go to Europe court in hopes of getting alleged abducted daughter back

Tasha Brown alleges her estranged wife abducted their daughter Kaydance Etchells in 2016

‘Benzos’ and fentanyl a deadly cocktail causing a growing concern on B.C. streets

Overdoses caused by benzodiazepines can’t be reversed with opioid-overdose antidote naloxone

Scheer on Trump: It’s ‘offensive’ to question the family background of critics

Trump is being called a racist for saying that the four congresswomen should go back where they came from

Instagram expands Canadian pilot removing ‘like’ counts to more countries

Social media giant plans to roll out the test in Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Japan, Italy and Ireland

Most Read