This July 17, 2017, file photo shows a Netflix logo on an iPhone in Philadelphia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Matt Rourke

This July 17, 2017, file photo shows a Netflix logo on an iPhone in Philadelphia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Matt Rourke

Netflix Canada increases prices for its monthly standard, premium plans

The company says new members who sign up will see the updated prices effective immediately

Netflix Canada is increasing some of its prices again.

The streaming giant says the basic plan for subscribers remains unchanged at $9.99 a month, but the standard monthly plan is going up by one dollar to $14.99, and the premium by two dollars to $18.99.

Netflix says it’s implementing the price increase so it “can invest more in films and shows as well as the quality of members’ product experience.”

The company says new members who sign up will see the updated prices effective immediately.

The new charges will roll out to existing members according to their billing cycle over the coming weeks.

Existing members will be notified about the change via email and the Netflix app 30 days before the new prices are applied to them.

Netflix has cancelled some of its programming recently due to COVID-19 pandemic-related issues, including “Glow,” “The Society” and “I Am Not Okay With This.”

The company’s last price increase in Canada was announced in November 2018. At that time it bumped up the basic monthly plan by a dollar to $9.99, the standard by $3 to $13.99, and the premium by $3 to $16.99.

The basic plan lets subscribers watch on one screen at a time at a lower-quality resolution. The standard plan allows two screens with high-definition resolution. And the premium offers four-screen usage and ultra HD, 4K video.

“Canadians have never had more choices when it comes to entertainment and we’re more committed than ever to delivering an experience that exceeds their expectations,” Netflix said in a statement about Thursday’s price increase.

“Members tell us how much they value variety and we’re updating our prices so that we can continue to invest in more shows and films. As always we will continue to offer a range of plans so that people can pick a price that works for their budget.”

Netflix launched in Canada in September 2010, charging $7.99 for unlimited TV shows and movies per month.

READ MORE: Netflix adds 16 million global subscribers partly during start of pandemic

Victoria Ahearn, The Canadian Press


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