Both vulnerable

Both vulnerable

Play Bridge: Every hand is an adventure

"In the discussion of weak two’s, I would be remiss if I did not mention an aggressive system that is weak-two based."

In the discussion of weak two’s, I would be remiss if I did not mention an aggressive system that is weak-two based. Someone, who has played against the system, may think that EHAA stands for every hand is an annoyance, but in fact, it stands for every hand is an adventure.

The system of EHAA is a four-card major system with every two opening, including Two Clubs, being a wide-range weak two. Openings of Two Clubs through Two Spades show a weak two with six to twelve HCP’s and a five or longer suit. Conventional weak two are Two Diamonds through Two Spades showing a six-card suit or an excellent five-card suit with 5 to 10 HCP’s.

Where the adventure comes into play is the quality of the suit. Conventional weak two’s are not opened without some suit quality and vulnerability consideration, whereas EHAA will open five cards to the Six at any vulnerability and even with a bare minimum.

Thus the adventure begins. EHAA uses the principle of getting into almost every auction quickly and getting out quickly. The opponents are often left at the two-level or higher trying to figure out where they belong.

The bidding: South has a hand that qualifies for an adventurous weak Two Hearts. North makes an asking bid because he has an invitational hand of 14 points and four-card Heart support. South replies that he has a bad suit and a bad hand between 6 and 9 HCP’s. North corrects to Three Hearts and that is where they play.

The Opening lead: The Jack of Spades.

The Play: Declarer wins the King of Spades and draws trump. He also pays close attention to the Spade spots. He cashes the Queen of Spades and then plays a small Spade to the 7. A losing Diamond is pitched on the fourth Spade. South loses two Clubs making Three Hearts plus two for +200.