Last year’s Mistletoe Market raised money for the Trail Hospice Society. This year

Last year’s Mistletoe Market raised money for the Trail Hospice Society. This year

Trail crafters unite for festive sale

A growing community of local crafters and artisans will make a splash this Saturday with the 5th annual Mistletoe Market at the Riverbelle.

This story has been updated with the following correction:Trail Firefighters will no longer be  barbequing at the market, but will still be there with their firetruck for children’s viewing pleasure.

A growing community of local crafters and artisans will make a splash this Saturday with the fifth-annual Mistletoe Market.

About 30 vendors – selling everything from pottery, Tupperware, handmade clothing, knits and more – are turning the Riverbelle into a festive shopping experience from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with $2 entrance per person and 10 per cent of the day’s sales and orders going to the British Columbia Professional Fire Fighting Burn Fund.

“It’s great to see the community come together with all the different venders and artisans and it’s nice to be able to donate back to a local charity or cause,” said organizer and vendor Rachel Jansen. “We like the small atmosphere at the Riverbelle but we are busting at the seams.”

Organizers may have to look at introducing another market with wait lists stacking up for both the spring (Creative Blooming) and winter markets. She attributes the success to the different, local finds and the charity element.

“I think that people feel good about coming in and doing a little extra shopping potentially if they know the proceeds are going to help someone else in their community,” said Jansen.

The past two years have seen 10 markets, with nearly $10,000 raised.

After asking vendors for their input on a local charity or cause to support this year, the burn fund topped the list. Word got back that a crafter’s husband is a member of the Trail Firefighters Local 941(which supports the cause) and a vendor’s daughter is dating a burn victim.

“You always hear about fires occurring and there has been a couple of people locally who have been affected by fires,” said Jansen.

More than 3,700 professional firefighters from 50 communities in B.C. and the Yukon contribute to the British Columbia Professional Fire Fighters Burn Fund by dedicating their time and skills to support burn survivors and increase the public’s knowledge about fire and safety issues.

The burn fund not only does preventive work but the registered charity, established in 1978 by the B.C. Professional Fire Fighters Association, also supports burn victims in B.C.

Across the province, firefighters fundraise for burn victims, sending a portion of the proceeds to the large provincial pot and injecting some money into local initiatives.

“It’s a nice idea, too, that there is a number of local artisans and vendors and if you want to keep your money local then we give you the perfect venue to do that,” added Jansen. “And you get to donate back to your community too so it’s a nice little cycle.”

There will be door prizes for each vendor, coffee and mulled apple cider provided as well as a firefighter’s barbecue on site.

For more information on fundraising for the burn unit visit http://burnfund.donorpages.com/BldgPerFund/TrevorCarmichael