Ron Broda putting on the lining for his prosthetic leg at his North Saanich home. Broda announced earlier this month that he is running for the People’s Party of Canada. (Black Press Media file photo)

Ex-B.C. cop who lost leg in collision is running against Elizabeth May

Ron Broda is running in the Saanich-Gulf Islands riding for the People’s Party of Canada

A former police officer who lost his leg after being struck by a vehicle at Victoria’s Ogden Point is running for the People’s Party of Canada in the Saanich-Gulf Islands riding.

“I decided to run in this year’s federal election simply because I cannot vote for the other options available,” said Ron Broda on Facebook announcing his candidacy. Since ‘none of the above’ was an option, Broda said he decided to offer himself as a “viable alternative” for voters, who “like me, don’t like the other choices.”

RELATED: Ron Broda waiting for a leg up on the Saanich Peninsula

Broda said in a later interview that he used to be a Progressive Conservative, before becoming disillusioned with the party in eventually joined the People’s Party of Canada under Maxime Bernier, who founded the party after losing the leadership contest for the Conservative Party of Canada. “His values and vision resonated with me,” he said.

Broda said he is running with the goal to restore trust between the political class and the public. He also expressed frustration with the current political culture. “People seem to take offence at the slightest things,” he said, adding that he would like to see an “open and honest” discussion about the issues without the risk of being mis-labelled.

But he declined to give a specific example of a statement that politicians would not be allowed to air in the public.

He also defended Bernier’s criticism of multi-culturalism. “We are all Canadians regardless of ethnic and religious backgrounds,” he said. “I’m a Canadian first and we should all be Canadians first,” he said.

Broda is running against incumbent and federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May. “I don’t think she has considered all the evidence related to climate change,” he said, pointing to what he calls a “significant” amount of evidence that contradicts prevailing scientific views on the subject. “Climate change is real,” he said. “There is no question about it.” But if humans are having a effect, it is not clear if they bear full responsibility for it or if they are just one factor among many, he said. “It’s matter of degree.”

Broda lost his leg in July 2013 after an SUV struck him while he was riding his motorcycle. Broda, who said he has no memory of the crash, later sued the driver of the SUV, claiming he had been deliberately struck. The driver received 60 days in jail and a driving prohibition of five years in October 2016, after being found guilty of dangerous driving causing bodily harm. In September 2017, a court upheld this sentence.

But that’s not the only crash Broda has been involved in that has made headlines. In 2006, while driving an 18-wheeler, Broda struck a six-year-old walking on Blanshard Street. The collision left the boy with crushed legs and other injuries. Broda has publicly acknowledged the pain he has caused because of this incident.

According to his professional online profile, Broda currently works as a teacher and speaker, offering workshops, seminars, and other personal growth services.

Before this current career, Broda spent 14 years with the Vancouver Police Department, 14 years with the Saanich Police Department and seven years with the Canada Border Services Agency.

The events of 2013 loom large in Broda’s profile.

“That experience drove home to me how precious and uncertain that life can be. I have a much greater appreciation for living each day to the fullest. I have a greater sense of urgency to accomplish what I am meant to with my life,” he writes.

Also running in Saanich–Gulf Islands are Liberal Ryan Windsor, Conservative David Bush, and New Democrat Sabina Singh.

wolfgang.depner@peninsulanewsreview.com


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