The BC Conservation Officer Service is asking people not to disturb fawns, even if they appear alone. Photo: AP/Mike Groll

The BC Conservation Officer Service is asking people not to disturb fawns, even if they appear alone. Photo: AP/Mike Groll

Letter: ‘Don’t be a fawn-napper’

Lonely-looking fawns likely aren’t actually abandoned, conservation service says

It’s that time of year again where we remind the public to please not disturb fawns they may see alone outside — they are very likely not abandoned.

Every year, the BC Conservation Officer Service receives calls from well-intentioned people trying to ‘rescue’ fawns they believe are orphaned, but interfering can cause more harm than good.

We understand they are cute and appear defenceless, but please be assured it is common for does to leave their fawns for hours at a time while they forage for food. Moving a fawn can result in it not being able to reunite with its mother, thus greatly reducing its chances of survival. Leaving newborn deer alone is the best thing you can do to help them.

Taking a fawn into your care is also illegal under the Wildlife Act, and people can be fined for unlawful possession of live wildlife.

Please also remember to keep your pets on a leash, as deer can become aggressive when protecting its young.

If you are concerned a fawn is injured or abandoned, please call the RAPP line at 1.877.952.7277.

BC Conservation Officer Service

British ColumbiaConservationWildlife