Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital offers services including core physician specialties, 24 hour emergency and trauma services, Level 2 laboratory, acute and obstetrical care, psychiatry, and chemotherapy. Photo: Jim Bailey

Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital offers services including core physician specialties, 24 hour emergency and trauma services, Level 2 laboratory, acute and obstetrical care, psychiatry, and chemotherapy. Photo: Jim Bailey

My visit to Trail hospital

Letter to the Editor from Michael Plul of Cranbrook

From the outset, I was informed that demands for beds at the hospital by far exceeds availability.

With current efforts of expansion, that issue should be resolved over time.

It was suggested that I contact Sanctuary House where accommodation is available for patients at a very reasonable rate.

I stayed there one day, prior to surgery and two additional days during post- surgery.

My first impression of Trail was rather unfavourable, but I soon changed my mind.

I found a fairly new building on Bay Avenue that housed a museum and a library.

What a wonderful surprise!

The museum revealed a remarkable history of sporting events in Trail going back several decades.

Citizens here have every reason to be proud of their participation in track and field, hockey, baseball, and curling.

As an ardent curler I was pleasantly surprised to see that Trail represented British Columbia at the Annual National Brier competition.

Residents of Trail must also cherish their new library.

The vast number of books available is astounding and the ability to order other items is unlimited.

I suspect that many families in the surrounding area take advantage of this remarkable facility on a regular basis.

During their stay in the hospital, patients are constantly under scrutiny.

I made a few blunders, managed to make a fool of myself, but that’s a small price to pay for successful surgery that’s beyond reproach.

If I offended anyone, I now apologize.

Young nurses usually have many difficult tasks and unusual demands placed upon themselves, but during the horrid COVID-19 era, the circumstances are exasperated.

Some patient behaviour may be appalling, but as they gain experience, nurses learn to set aside the foibles of human nature, and to give professional call a higher priority.

Residents of Trail and the surrounding area are fortunate to have an excellent hospital with state-of-the-art equipment and a professional staff second to none.

Thank you for a job well done!

Michael Plul

Military Social Work Office – Retired

Cranbrook

Letter to the Editor

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