Redpolls, pine siskins, pine and evening grosbeaks (pictured), and sometimes crossbills (red or white-winged) are the most common “suicide birds.” They form small or large flocks during fall and winter and consider B.C. highways prime habitat during the worst of the year. Photo: Jim Merritt

Redpolls, pine siskins, pine and evening grosbeaks (pictured), and sometimes crossbills (red or white-winged) are the most common “suicide birds.” They form small or large flocks during fall and winter and consider B.C. highways prime habitat during the worst of the year. Photo: Jim Merritt

Sound your horn to help save B.C. birds

Letter to the Editor from Gord DeRosa of Trail

To the Editor,

I feel compelled to report the following observance from Thursday, Oct. 29th, which I made while travelling over the Nancy Greene Summit.

In travelling mid-morning, I came upon many flocks of small winter birds on the road picking up sand.

Sounding my horn did have the birds take flight off the road.

However, I would see one or two in each bunch that were dead, having been hit by cars.

Well, one or two out of a flock of 30 or 40 birds killed is bad enough, but I came upon what must have been 50 or 60 dead birds littering the road near the summit.

I assume they were hit by some freight or logging truck.

Now, if the simple action of drivers sounding their horns saves these birds, then is it not a good idea to have province-wide highway signage instructing the action?

At the rate of road kill I saw in just one day, it’s not going to be too long before there won’t be any birds to save.

Respectfully submitted,

Gord DeRosa

Trail

P.S. There is a homemade sign posted on a tree at Mud Lake with a similar message – thanks.

Letter to the EditorWildlife