Applications are due Sept. 4. (Photo by Clément Coclet on Unsplash)

Applications are due Sept. 4. (Photo by Clément Coclet on Unsplash)

Wildsight to hire and train West Kootenay youth for climate action

Spots available for 10 West Kootenay youth, ages 19-29, for a climate and youth leadership program

Wildsight is looking to hire 10 West Kootenay youth, ages 19-29, for a new program focused on climate action and youth leadership. Responding to both climate change and COVID-19, Wildsight’s goal is to empower young people to inspire and implement solutions to the climate crisis through employment, training, mentorship, and leadership development.

Latest on Coronavirus here: COVID-19 news

From mid-September to mid-January, the inaugural Youth Climate Corps (YCC) crew will tackle a variety of projects related to both climate crisis mitigation and adaptation throughout the West Kootenay including community wildfire risk reduction, local food security and sustainability, energy efficiency and sustainability, and youth leadership.

Anticipated projects include clearing away dangerous forest fuels that threaten key community assets, building community food production infrastructure, helping retrofit buildings to reduce energy consumption, and stepping into leadership roles to advance community engagement and momentum around climate crisis solutions.

Along the way, crew members will learn about the many dimensions of climate change and train in both “hard” and “soft” skills beneficial for careers that are personally fulfilling and advance effective on-the-ground climate action.

Crew members will receive an $8,000 stipend for their participation and completion of this program, in addition to extensive training, mentoring, and work experience.

Though several West Kootenay locals had long envisioned a Youth Climate Corps program to accelerate local climate action, the COVID-19 pandemic helped create the urgency and opportunity to move the YCC from a nascent idea toward implementation.

“The Youth Climate Corps is about empowering young people with a sense of agency,” says Richard Klein, one of the program creators. “They will build safer, more resilient communities while they get their hands dirty and learn new skills. YCC crew members will help mobilize their communities to take action on the climate crisis we face.”

In June, YCC program leaders convened a day-long workshop to explore how to build a program that is impactful and responsive to young people’s needs. Twelve local youth joined with seven community leaders to brainstorm ways to empower young people to address a range of climate change-related opportunities and challenges.

“I grew up in Nelson and I want to live in a resilient, vibrant community for years to come,” says Arianna Murphy-Steed, one of the youth attendees at the June YCC workshop. “Looking ahead, I am confronted with a great deal of uncertainty but I know my generation has much to contribute toward tackling the complex problems facing our society.”

The Youth Climate Corps is set to make a difference.

As the impacts of climate change intensify and the pandemic continues to damage local economies, Wildsight anticipates the YCC will help launch a cohort of freshly inspired young people into successful careers that lead the way to a climate-resilient future. Following the debut of this inaugural West Kootenay crew, Wildsight will work toward enabling similar projects in other locations across the Columbia Basin.

For more information and to apply, visit wildsight.ca/programs/youth-climate-corps/.

Applications are due by Sept. 4.

Substantially funded by the Government of Canada through the Canada-British Columbia Workforce Development Agreement. Additional funding provided by the Kootenay Career Development Society and other project partners.

Contact: Graeme Lee Rowlands, Program Coordinator, Youth Climate Corps at graeme@wildsight.ca, 250.427.9325 ext. 230 or Lorene Keitch, Wildsight Communications, lorene@wildsight.ca, 250.688.8058.



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Letter to the Editor

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Long-term care staff and physicians from the priority group received their first dose of Moderna vaccine on Friday, Jan. 15, including Dr. Corrine Knox. Photo: Submitted
Moderna vaccine arrives in Trail

Vaccine rollout began in West Kootenay with long term care residents and staff the first recipients

crowe shop
Shop class receives wonderful response from West Kootenay residents

“Each item came with its own little story which was really neat to hear.” - Dale Smyth

(File photo)
Rossland council surveys residents for input on new city plan

Rosslands Official Community Plan has run its course, and the city is nudging residents for input

Amanda Parsons, a registered nurse on staff at the Northwood Care facility, administers a dose of the Moderna vaccine to Ann Hicks, 77, in Halifax on Monday, Jan. 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan-Pool
61 new COVID-19 cases, two more deaths in Interior Health

Twenty-nine people are in hospital, seven of whom are in intensive care

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, vice-president of logistics and operations at the Public Health Agency of Canada, speaks at a news conference on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
B.C. records 500 new COVID-19 cases Wednesday, 14 deaths

Outbreak at Surrey Pretrial jail, two more in health care

Vancouver Canucks’ Travis Hamonic grabs Montreal Canadiens’ Josh Anderson by the face during first period NHL action in Vancouver, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Horvat scores winner as Canucks dump Habs 6-5 in shootout thriller

Vancouver and Montreal clash again Thursday night

Interior Health has declared the Cariboo Chilcotin a community cluster. (Angie Mindus photo)
Interior Health declares Cariboo Chilcotin region a COVID-19 cluster, 215 cases since Jan. 1

Most cases are related to transmission at social events and gatherings in Williams Lake

A woman writes a message on a memorial mural wall by street artist James “Smokey Devil” Hardy during a memorial to remember victims of illicit drug overdose deaths on International Overdose Awareness Day, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on Monday, August 31, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. paramedics respond to record-breaking number of overdose calls in 2020

On the front lines, COVID-19 has not only led to more calls, but increased the complexity

Vernon's Noric House long-term care facility is dealing with an influenza outbreak amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (File photo)
Two more deaths at Vernon care home

Noric House case numbers remain steady, but death toll rises

Eighteen-year-old Aidan Webber died in a marine accident in 2019. He was a Canadian Junior BMX champion from Nanaimo. (Submitted)
Inadequate safety training a factor in teen BMX star’s workplace death in 2019

Aidan Webber was crushed by a barge at a fish farm near Port Hardy

Southern resident killer whales in B.C. waters. Research shows the population’s females are more negatively influenced by vessel traffic than males. (Photo supplied by Ocean Wise Conservation Association)
Female orcas less likely to feed in presence of vessel traffic: study

Research the southern resident population raises concerns over reproduction capacity

(Black Press Media files)
Transport Canada not budging on enclosed deck rules, despite calls from BC Ferries union

There have been at least 23 cases of the U.K. variant detected in Canada, four of which are in B.C.

The Elk Valley Hospital is adapting to meet the needs of patients in the Elk Valley.
1-in-5 COVID tests coming back positive in and around Fernie, sparking concern

Dr Ron Clark of Elk Valley Hospital said one in five tests was returning positive for COVID-19

Most Read