Both Vulnerable

Both Vulnerable

Playing strong jump shifts

The bidding:

A reverse is a strong bid, but there are other options. One being the strong jump shift. Like the reverse the longer suit is bid first, but unlike the reverse, it is the higher ranking suit. The player then jumps into the shorter or equal length lower ranking suit.

The bidding:

A reverse is a strong bid, but there are other options. One being the strong jump shift. Like the reverse the longer suit is bid first, but unlike the reverse, it is the higher ranking suit. The player then jumps into the shorter or equal length lower ranking suit.

A jump shift is virtually a game forcing bid and shows 17 or more points. Whether it is 17, 18 or 19 is usually by partnership agreement, however, if the bid gets one to a makeable game opposite partner’s minimum then it is a good bid.

South, with two five-card minors, opens one diamond. Partner bids his four card major and South jumps or jump shifts into clubs, denying four spades. North could sign off in five clubs but his hand is strong enough to show his spade values.

Partner may think it is a try for three notrump which South does here. However, when North corrects to five clubs, South realizes it was slam encouragement. With five-card club support, a bullet (ace) and a stiff (singleton), that is a good move. South signs off in six clubs.

The contract:  Six clubs by South

The opening lead: The jack of hearts

The play: Ruffing Finesse Revisited (Jan 18, 2011)

With a singleton opposite AQJ10 in a side suit, declarer cashes the ace and then plays the queen. If it is covered, he ruffs, otherwise he discards a loser. If declarer discards a loser and the queen loses, he has the jack and the ten for other losers.

Declarer wins the ace of hearts, draws trump and cashes the ace of diamonds. The queen of diamonds is covered so declarer ruffs it in the dummy and disposes of his spade losers on the diamonds.

The result: Six clubs making plus one for +1390

Note: -Ruffing out the King is always an option if declarer thinks the king will fall.

-Taking a finesse with a singleton is also an option. Declarer must decide where the king is likely to be and how protected it is. How many pitches (discards) needed is also a factor.