St. Paul’s Foundation announces Scotiabank has donated $2 million to their youth transition program on May 14, 2019. From left to right, Fiona Dalton, CEO of Providence Health Care, Lesly Tayles, senior vice-president of B.C. and Yukon Scotiabank, Sierra Turner, patient of transition program, Dr. Jasmine Grewal, medical director of the Pacific Adult Congenital Heart Program, and Dick Vollet, president and CEO of St. Paul’s Foundation. (St. Paul’s)

St. Paul’s Foundation announces Scotiabank has donated $2 million to their youth transition program on May 14, 2019. From left to right, Fiona Dalton, CEO of Providence Health Care, Lesly Tayles, senior vice-president of B.C. and Yukon Scotiabank, Sierra Turner, patient of transition program, Dr. Jasmine Grewal, medical director of the Pacific Adult Congenital Heart Program, and Dick Vollet, president and CEO of St. Paul’s Foundation. (St. Paul’s)

$2-million donation to support youth transition care at St. Paul’s Hospital

The Scotiabank Youth Transition Program will expand existing programs

A $2-million donation to St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver will help support kids and teens with serious health issues who are moving from pediatric to adult care.

The Scotiabank Youth Transition Program was announced on Tuesday and will expand various programs at the hospital for young people across the province with a dedicated manager.

“Over the years and throughout varies admissions, the team at St. Paul’s has continued to walk alongside of me,” said Sierra Turner at the news conference. The 25-year-old has been a patient of the eating disorder program since she turned 18.

Dr. Jasmine Grewal, medical director of the Pacific Adult Congenital Heart Program, said the transition from pediatric to adult care can be a challenge for young people, especially those who have to bear the responsibilities of navigating appointments and travel expenses that may deter them from maintaining their health.

Each year, 300 new patients with congenital heart disease move from BC Children’s Hospital to her clinic as they turn 18.

“This gift will allow our incredible team at St. Paul’s to offer more workshops, mentorship, and resources – helping us to provide a more comprehensive wellness experience to youth during a challenging and pivotal time in their lives,” Grewal said.

READ MORE: St. Paul’s Hospital replacement slated to open in Vancouver in 2026

St. Paul’s is the provincial centre for highly-specialized programs relating to congenital heart disease, cystic fibrosis, kidney disease, organ transplants, substance use disorders and eating disorders.



joti.grewal@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Tim Schewe is a retired constable.
Drivesmart column: Passing on the right

If there is room for a driver or cyclist to squeeze through, they will do it.

Camp Koolaree’s wash house was crushed by a downed tree in last week’s windstorm. Photo: Submitted
Kootenay windstorm had trees crashing down on Camp Koolaree

To donate funds to help rebuild Camp Koolaree, residents can go to canadahelps.org

Letters to the Editor can be emailed to editor@trailtimes.ca. Photo: File
Help available to obtain BC Recover Benefit at Trail FAIR Society

Letter from Naomi Bain, Poverty Law Advocate, Trail FAIR Society

Researchers Farhad Ahmadijokani and Mohammad Arjmand, from UBC’s Okanagan campus, have developed a cost-effective material that can help remove toxic chemicals, like cancer-treatment drugs, from water supplies. Photo: UBCO
New tool developed at UBC Okanagan removes chemotherapy drugs from water systems

Research collaboration with UBC, Sharif University of Technology and the Soniya College of Pharmacy

Big White firefighters follow a century-long tradition of using human power to push their new apparatus into its fire station bay. The one-of-a-kind Ladder 311 is ready for deployment to fight structural fires at Big White. Photo: Andrew Jay
New ladder truck for Big White fire department

The new RDKB workhorse is the product of five years’ work

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, vice-president of logistics and operations at the Public Health Agency of Canada, speaks at a news conference on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
B.C. records 500 new COVID-19 cases Wednesday, 14 deaths

Outbreak at Surrey Pretrial jail, two more in health care

(Pxhere)
B.C. nurse suspended after using Tensor bandage to trap long-term care patient in room

Susan Malloch voluntarily agreed to a three-day suspension of her certificate of registration

Abbotsford’s Skully White (left), who donated his kidney in December, has started a campaign to find other recipients and donors. The first candidate is retired police officer Gavin Quon. White owns and operates a hotdog stand, Lullys Food Experience, out of the Abbotsford Canadian Tire parking lot. (Facebook photo)
After donating his kidney, Abbotsford hotdog king starts donor campaign

Skully White donated his kidney to customer Tim Hiscock in December

Toronto-based director Michelle Latimer was recently scrutinized after years of claiming she was of Algonquin and Metis descent. (CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)
Haida activist calls for hefty fines, jail time against those who claim to be Indigenous

Filmmaker Tamara Bell proposing the Indigenous Identity Act – to dissuade ‘Indigenous identity theft’

(File)
Man allegedly bites Vancouver cop during arrest for outstanding warrant

The officer was treated in hospital for the bite wounds

Black bear cubs Athena and Jordan look on from their enclosure at the North Island Wildlife Recovery Association in Errington, B.C., on July 8, 2015. Conservation Officer Bryce Casavant won the hearts of animal lovers when he opted not to shoot the baby bears in July after their mother was destroyed for repeatedly raiding homes near Port Hardy, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Supreme Court quashes review of B.C. conservation officer who refused to euthanize bears

Bryce Casavant was dismissed from his job for choosing not to shoot the cubs in 2015

(File Photo)
Interior Health says COVID positivity rates in Fernie area actually 10-12%

IH say the rates are not as high as previously claimed by the region’s top doctor

Francina Mettes and Thomas Schouten with the 200-page document they submitted in December of 2018. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)
Dutch man, 94, facing unwanted trip home can stay in B.C. with wife of 45 years

Immigration offices cuts red tape so couple of 45 years can stay together in Victoria area

Most Read