Kayla Bourque. (BC Corrections photo)

B.C. animal killer Kayla Bourque back in police custody

Bourque is alleged to have breached two of her 43 court-ordered conditions

A high-risk violent offender with a history of causing injury or suffering to animals is back in police custody, after allegedly breaching two of her 43 court-ordered conditions.

BC Corrections notes Kayla Bourque “has been convicted of causing unnecessary pain, suffering or injury to animals, willfully and without lawful excuse killing animals and possessing a weapon for a dangerous purpose.”

She relocated to Surrey from New Westminster last June, prompting an advisory to residents.

On Jan. 11, BC Prosecution Service spokesman Dan McLaughlin told the Now-Leader Bourque is alleged to have breached a condition that required her not to possess pornography of any kind, which allegedly occurred between Sept. 17 and Nov. 23, 2017, at or near New Westminster.

A trial on that count is set to begin on Jan. 22, he noted.

McLaughlin said she is also alleged to have breached a bail term restricting her from accessing devices with internet capability. That offence is alleged to have occurred between Aug. 23 and Sept. 18, 2018, at or near New Westminster.

“She is currently in custody and has a bail hearing scheduled for Jan. 22,” he added.

See more: Advisory issued over animal killer’s planned relocation to Surrey (June 29, 2018)

Last summer, BC Corrections issued an advisory notifying the public when Bourque relocated from New Westminster to Surrey.

In that release, BC Corrections said Bourque was to be highly monitored by authorities and had 43 court-ordered conditions, including that she’s not to be outside of residence between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m., except for the purpose of obtaining emergency medical treatment and except with the prior written permission of a probation officer.

Her conditions also stipulated she must not contact or associate with anyone under the age of 18 and not attend any public school, parks, playground, swimming pools or areas adjacent to swimming pools. She was also not to have access to, possession, control or ownership of any device capable of accessing the internet.

She was also prohibited from owning, having custody, or control of, or residing in any premises where animals or birds are present.



amy.reid@surreynowleader.com

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