Drivers are being reminded to give horses and their riders and a wide berth when encountering them on the road. (Pixabay File)

B.C. drivers told to be nice to other road users, especially those on horseback

Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure reminds drivers to share road with horses

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure calls on drivers to “use extra caution and be courteous when passing horses and riders in rural areas,” this summer.

As the sunny weather sees more equestrians steering their charges on to the roads, the ministry has decided to assist drivers by improving signage, including tabs providing more information about where horses can be expected. They hope the signs will remind drivers and riders to “share the road,” as they do with cyclists and pedestrians, “to prevent surprise and promote courtesy and safety for all.”

ALSO READ: Central Saanich councillor wants free transit for all

Many drivers perhaps don’t realize that horses and their riders are recognized road users in the Motor Vehicle Act, and drivers should expect their presence when passing through rural areas.

The ministry collaborated with the Horse Council of B.C. to improve the wording on the signs as well as to receive guidance on where they should be placed. The signs are available for any regions that want to improve awareness in areas where horseback riding is popular.

In a statement, the ministry said, “Drivers can watch for signs at the start of any roadway or along narrow or winding roads commonly used for horseback riding. However, even in areas without posted signs, the ministry reminds all travellers to use caution and stay alert for diverse road users.”

ALSO READ: Indian Army photos discovers footprints they say belong to our Sasquatch cousin

The new advice reminds drivers to slow down, give a wide berth, accelerate slowly to avoid kicking up gravel, limit noise and only pass if the horse doesn’t seem agitated.

Riders have some responsibility too, and have been told to use caution when travelling on narrow roads or in times of low visibility.They should also wear reflective vests, and adorn their horses with high-visibility leg bands.

For more information about sharing the road safely with horses and riders visit tranbc.ca.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Donation supports music therapy in Trail care home

Funding given for music therapy program at Columbia View Lodge

Trail man charged with murder, in court

Joel Anderson was charged with second degree murder in January 2019

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas in lobby of Trail hospital

Over the years, Marisa Jimenez has raised $61,710 through her Poplar Ridge Christmas raffle

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share email it (large or actual) to editor@trailtimes.ca

Trail Smoke Eaters host Langley Rivermen and Chilliwack Chiefs this weekend

Trail Smoke Eaters look to get back on winning track against Mainland Division teams

‘I was bawling’: Injured Bronco’s mother stunned by his progress after surgery

Ryan Straschnitzki isn’t expecting a cure but hopes to restore some muscle movement

Study finds microplastics in all remote Arctic beluga whales tested

Lead author Rhiannon Moore says she wasn’t expecting to see so many microplastics so far north

Services needed in B.C. for early-onset Alzheimer’s disease patients: doctor, advocates

More patients are being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at an earlier age

65-million-year-old triceratops fossil arrives in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a Triceratops prosus

B.C. widow sues health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Changes to B.C. building code address secondary suites, energy efficiency

Housing Minister Selina Robinson says the changes will help create more affordable housing

B.C. woman banned from owning animals after horrific dog abuse case

Melissa Tooshley gets suspended sentence in Teddy the dog case

Security guard at Kamloops music festival gets three years for sexually assaulting concertgoer

Shawn Christopher Gray walked the woman home after she became seperated from her friends, court heard

Most Read