A drawing of Sea to Sky Gondola’s proposed new “elevated tree walk experience” at the attraction in Squamish. (submitted)

‘Canada’s newest iconic landmark’ proposed to spiral skyward in Squamish

Pending approvals, the structure would be the first of its kind in North America

A new “elevated tree walk experience” is being pitched by operators of Sea to Sky Gondola in Squamish.

The “accessible, architecturally stunning” attraction would “wind 34 metres into the sky, offering soaring 360° views and access for guests of all ages and abilities,” according to a release Wednesday (Feb. 6).

The “elevated trail experience” would start at the Summit Lodge and lead guests on a 2.5-kilometre return trip through the trees and over wetlands along Panorama Ridge.

Pending approvals, the spiraling structure would be the first of its kind in North America, facility operators say, and would be designed “to integrate into nature from all angles and viewpoints beautifully.”

It would be “a significant multi-million-dollar infrastructure investment” for operators of the Squamish-area attraction, which opened in the spring of 2014.

“The elevated tree walk we have envisioned and propose will make it easy for our guests of all ages and abilities to better connect to the great outdoors, regardless of the season and no matter the weather,” Kirby Brown, Sea to Sky Gondola general manager, said in a release.

“This structure would be Canada’s newest iconic landmark, and its location, immersed in nature, will solidify Squamish as a must-see Canadian tourism destination.”

The project is subject to First Nations “engagement” as well as local and provincial government approvals, the company noted.

“The Sea to Sky Gondola has received the appropriate development applications from the Squamish Lillooet Regional District with the goal to be breaking ground in fall 2019 and opening in spring 2020.”

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