The six-storey wood frame Radius apartment complex under construction in Royal Oak promises to further increase the supply of affordable housing. Compared to the rest of Canada, households in British Columbia spent the most on shelter. Travis Paterson/News Staff

Canadians spent almost $64,000 on goods and services in 2017

Households in B.C. each spent $71,001 with housing costs contributing to higher average

The average Canadian household spent $63,723 on goods and services in 2017, according to Statistics Canada.

That figure is up 2.5 per cent from 2016.

READ MORE: B.C. housing prices forecast to stay high despite moderating demand

RELATED: Unaffordable housing blamed for Capital Region job shortages

Shelter remains the largest budget item for households in 2017, accounting for 29.2 per cent of their total consumption of goods and services. Shelter is deemed unaffordable if it absorbs more than 30 per cent of household income. Shelter costs also partially account for the fact that households in B.C. spent almost $8,000 more than the average. Only Alberta households ($72,957) spent more than those in British Columbia ($71,001).

In fact, average shelter costs in British Columbia reached an average of $21,844 — the highest in Canada, ahead of second-placed Alberta, where average household spent $21,068. Not surprisingly, households in British Columbia and Alberta recorded the highest average spending on mortgage payments, and spent the most on rent.

RELATED: Rental vacancies are rising across Greater Victoria, but so are rents

RELATED: Langford, Sooke to see 494 affordable housing units in coming years

The cost of shelter also has a class bias. Whereas Canadian households in the lowest income group spent almost 35 per cent on their incomes on shelter, individuals in the highest income category spent 27.4 per cent. In terms of raw numbers, the richest Canadian households spent an average of $28,921 on shelter, the poorest $11,733.

Looking for the cheapest place in Canada to live? According to Statistics Canada, that would be New Brunswick, where households spent the least on goods and services, averaging $52,608, and the least on shelter at $12,692.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

wolfgang.depner@saanichnews.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Destination BC urges residents to rediscover B.C.

Destination BC to stay home and do their part in flattening the curve of COVID-19 in B.C.

Lost dog swims Columbia River multiple times searching for home

The dog was missing from his Castlegar home for three days.

Renewable energy remains on the Kootenay forefront

Letter to the Editor from Andrew O’Kane

B.C. Alzheimer’s society thanks virtual walkers

On May 31, West Kootenay residents united to support people affected by dementia

Wealth tax needed as gap between rich and poor grows

Cannings: Disparity between super-wealthy and the rest is much greater than previously estimated

Horrifying video shows near head-on collision on Trans Canada

The video was captured on dash cam along Highway 1

Fraser Valley woman complains of violent RCMP takedown during wellness check

Mounties respond that she was not co-operating during Mental Health Act apprehension

B.C. sees 12 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

Three outbreaks exist in health-care settings

COVID-19: B.C. promotes video-activated services card

Mobile app allows easier video identity verification

ICBC to resume road tests in July with priority for rebookings, health-care workers

Tests have been on hold for four months due to COVID-19

Would you take a COVID-19 vaccine? Poll suggests most Canadians say yes

75 per cent of Canadians would agree to take a novel coronavirus vaccine

Budget officer pegs cost of basic income as calls for it grow due to COVID-19

Planned federal spending to date on pandemic-related aid now tops about $174 billion

Sexologist likens face mask debate to condom debate: What can we learn from it?

Society’s approach to condom usage since the 1980s can be applied to face masks today, one expert says

Most Read