Cold spell doesn’t create spike in Trail shelter use

The recent bite of cold weather and wet conditions hasn’t increased the number of nightly patrons to the homeless shelter in Greater Trail.

The recent bite of cold weather and wet conditions hasn’t increased the number of nightly patrons to the homeless sheltersheri in Greater Trail.

“Weather hasn’t appeared to be a determining factor on who or when people stay at the shelter,” said Gail Pighin, from Career Development Services (CDS).

Pighin said that over Christmas and Boxing Day, the shelter saw two clients. Last year, there were three clients using the shelter during the same period.

“Overall the number of people using the shelter has significantly decreased from last year,” she added.

The CDS reports that there have been 12 individuals using the shelter so far this year.

On average there is one person per night, and typically it is the same person for a few nights in a row, said Pighin.

Community donations of food, blankets and warm clothes have contributed to the success of the shelter, and Pighin said there have been no problems running it.

Outreach workers from the CDS program, “Getting to Home: Homelessness Project”, are on site nightly to assist shelter occupants with access to services in the community.

“The project has made an impact in the number of individuals using the shelter,” said Pighin.

The six-bed shelter has been open in the basement of the United Church since Nov. 19.