Mark Carney the Governor of the Bank of England listens to a journalist’s question during a Financial Stability Report press conference at the Bank of England in the City of London, Thursday, July 11, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-POOL, Matt Dunham

Former Bank of Canada governor to serve as UN special envoy on ‘climate action’

Carney drew international recognition during the five years at the helm of the Bank of Canada

Bank of England governor Mark Carney, who previously served as Canada’s top central banker, will be taking on a new role as the United Nations’ special envoy on climate action and climate finance.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres made the announcement while speaking to reporters in Madrid on Sunday, adding the move will take effect next year.

Carney was due to step down as bank governor early next year, having already extended what was meant to be a five-year term.

During his tenure, the former investment banker played a key role in trying to manage the British economy as the country prepares to leave the European Union.

Carney drew international recognition during the five years at the helm of the Bank of Canada, and at one point was named on Time magazine’s “most influential” list.

He took over the job at the beginning of 2008 amid the first signs of the financial crisis, and has been widely credited for helping Canada weather the recession by keeping interest rates low.

In 2011, he was also appointed to oversee global financial reforms as head of the Financial Stability Board.

He has been speaking for years on the implications of climate change initiatives for the financial sector in the world, and emphasized the importance of ensuring that the financial system is resilient so that it can adjust and finance the transition to a low-carbon economy efficiently.

Carney, who hails from the Northwest Territories, has an undergraduate degree in economics from Harvard University and both a master’s and doctorate in economics from Oxford University.

He spent more than a decade with Goldman Sachs in London, Tokyo, New York and Toronto before joining the Bank of Canada in 2003 as deputy governor.

ALSO READ: Today’s babies won’t know life without climate change, new report warns

– with files from The Associated Press

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Ghirardosi lifts Smoke Eaters to win over Warriors

Smoke Eaters players make timely return from World Jr. A Challenge

Celebrate all-things Christmas in Trail, Saturday

Open house in the afternoon, Santa Parade in Trail downtown at 5 p.m.

Doukhobor place names form unique subset on Kootenay map

Place Names: Doukhobor place names of West Kootenay/Boundary

Last minute push for Christmas raffle tickets

Tickets are on sale in the Trail hospital lobby weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

British Comedy coming to Trail

Award-winning duo of James and Jamesy present their holiday comedy, “O Christmas Tea.”

VIDEO: More air-passenger rights go into effect this weekend

The first set of passenger rights arrived in mid-July in Canada

Five things of note from Trudeau’s mandate letters to his ministers

Some marching orders come from the Liberal Party’s campaign, while others are new additions

Scheer’s resignation tips party into internal war over school tuition payments

The Conservatives have a Toronto convention already scheduled for April

Aid a priority for idled Vancouver Island loggers, John Horgan says

Steelworkers, Western Forest Products returning to mediation

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Transportation Safety Board finishes work at B.C. plane crash site, investigation continues

Transport Canada provides information bulletin, family of victim releases statement

Trudeau sets 2025 deadline to remove B.C. fish farms

Foes heartened by plan to transition aquaculture found in Fisheries minister mandate letter

Wagon wheels can now be any size! B.C. community scraps 52 obsolete bylaws

They include an old bylaw regulating public morals

Indigenous mother wins $20,000 racial discrimination case against Vancouver police

Vancouver Police Board ordered to pay $20,000 and create Indigenous-sensitivity training

Most Read