Arts and Culture groups like the Greater Trail Creative Activities Centre Society for the Visual Arts received funding from the Community Gaming Grants. Photo: Jim Bailey

Arts and Culture groups like the Greater Trail Creative Activities Centre Society for the Visual Arts received funding from the Community Gaming Grants. Photo: Jim Bailey

Gaming grants give boost to Greater Trail arts, culture and sports

Trail Youth Baseball taps into Community Gaming Grant for first time

Arts, cultural and sports organizations in Greater Trail benefited in a big way from this year’s cycle of provincial Community Gaming Grants.

More than $45 million will be distributed to local organizations across B.C. through this stream of grant, including several in Rossland, Trail and Fruitvale.

After a difficult 2020 that saw the cancellation of many sports and arts and culture events, funds offered through the provincial program will be welcome for those still able to continue.

For sports organizations, the grants program is providing $27.3 million for over 800 not-for-profit groups across the province.

In Trail, the Greater Trail Minor Hockey Association will receive $64,500, the Greater Trail Swim Racing Society $15,400, Special Olympics BC Society – Trail $10,000, Trail Gymnastics Society $22,500, Trail Minor Baseball Society $9,000, and Trail Youth Baseball, $4,400.

While organizations like Trail minor hockey regularly access the gaming grants, it was a first for Trail Youth Baseball (TYB).

“This is the first year we applied for a grant so we haven’t got anything to compare it to,” said TYB president, Jim Maniago. “It sounds like we can carry things over to next year so we’ll use it towards equipment and our costs for next season.”

Like many others, the baseball season was essentially cancelled this summer with strict COVID restrictions, so the effect on finances was minimal.

“We did have everything ordered [jerseys, equipment, etc.] before the lockdown so we drained our account on that but we should recoup some next year once we have registrations coming in,” said Maniago. “Everything we did in 2020 we did really small scale so parents covered the costs as we went.”

The league also didn’t collect any funds from sponsors, but rather put up their sponsors’ signs on the Butler Park fences as a “sign” of good faith for the future.

In Fruitvale, the Beaver Valley Figure Skating Club will receive $16,200, and the Beaver Valley Nitehawks Hockey Club Society, $15,000.

Rossland’s Black Jack Cross Country Ski Club will get $18,000, Red Mountain Racers Society $21,500, the Rossland Figure Skating Club $10,000, and West Kootenay Timberwolves Lacrosse Society $7,000.

More than 700 not-for-profit B.C. arts organizations reaped about $18.1 million in rewards from the provinces commercial gambling revenues.

The Rossland Council for Arts and Culture accessed $7,700, the Rossland Historical Museum and Archives Association $24,500, and the Greater Trail Creative Activities Centre Society for the Visual Arts $3,850.

The gaming grants program distributes about $140M annually in funds raised from commercial gambling revenues to nearly 5,000 not-for-profit organizations that deliver programs to communities throughout B.C.

These grants ensure residents from all regions of the province have access to programs and services that improve their quality of life, support local needs and build vibrant communities.

This year, the program has made it a condition that all grant funding complies with the provincial health officer’s orders and provides flexibility for organizations to delay project and service delivery until they can do so safely.

Related read: Community grant program offeres boost to Greater Trail sports



sports@trailtimes.ca

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