Green Party MLA Andrew Weaver speaks at event with federal party leader Elizabeth May and interim B.C. party leader Adam Olsen.

Green MLA Weaver to seek leadership

UVic professor Andrew Weaver kept his options open for two years, but now says he wants to lead B.C. Green Party into 2017 election

He took a pay cut to go from the tranquil groves of academe to the bare-knuckle brawl of B.C. politics, but Andrew Weaver says he’s ready to lead the B.C. Green Party into the next election.

The first-term Oak Bay-Gordon Head MLA told reporters at the legislature this week he made up his mind over the Christmas holidays to carry on with his political career, after two years of keeping his options open.

Weaver said he will stand for the leadership of the party as it tries to consolidate its Vancouver Island foothold of one provincial and one federal seat, held by federal Green Party leader Elizabeth May. He said that leadership vote likely won’t be until 2016, to prepare for the next scheduled B.C. election in 2017.

A mathematician specializing in climate models, Weaver took political leave from the faculty of the University of Victoria to run in the 2013 election, and defeated former B.C. Liberal cabinet minister Ida Chong. He went from a $180,000 job at UVic to $101,000 as an MLA.

Weaver declined to seek the leadership after winning the party’s first-ever B.C. seat, and the party appointed Saanich North and the Islands candidate Adam Olsen as interim leader instead. Olsen has indicated he will run again in the seat where he came close in 2013, with voters who supported May in the last federal election.

Despite the marginal role given independent MLAs, Weaver has made an impression on the government and the opposition NDP. Premier Christy Clark has taken to praising his ideas, such as his call to replace flat-rate Medical Services Plan premiums with a system that shifts more of the cost to high-income earners.

Clark ruled that out for the February budget, but said Weaver’s suggestions are refreshing after the negative rhetoric of the NDP.

NDP leader John Horgan said promoting Weaver is just more political tactics by Clark.

“I think they’re trying to draw attention away from us, who I think are doing a relatively effective job, and trying to put a spotlight on someone who may well cut our grass over the long term,” Horgan said.

 

Just Posted

River rising in Trail

For up-to-date reservoir elevation and river flow information, visit BC Hydro’s website bchydro.com

Victorian-era magnate, con artist had Rossland connections

New book explores fascinating history of Whitaker Wright

Snowed In Comedy Tour returns to B.C.

Show comes to Trail on Jan. 30

Minor hockey roots preserved in Trail mural

The Trail Minor Hockey Association founded Minor Hockey Week in 1957

Tell the Times

Web Poll: Have you been the target of petty theft in Trail?

Keep focus on helping Canadians at home, Trudeau tells MPs at start of meeting

Trudeau said the Liberals will offer Canadians hope amid issue like climate change and global tensions

Pettersson returns to lead Canucks to 3-2 win over Red Wings

Vancouver’s super rookie has 2 points in first game back after knee injury

Skaters stranded in Saint John, NB, amid storm on last day of championships

More than half of the flights out of the city’s airport were cancelled due to the weather

Call for tighter bail rules after Saudi sex-crime suspect vanishes

Mohammed Zuraibi Alzoabi was facing charges related to alleged sexual assault, criminal harassment, assault and forcible confinement of a woman

12 poisoned eagles found on Vancouver Island

Improper disposal of euthanized animal suspected

Olympic softball qualifier to be held in B.C.

Tournament is to be held Aug. 25 to Sept. 1

B.C. resident creates global sport training program

The 20 hour course teaches the science and application of interval training at the university level

B.C. VIEWS: Fact-checking the NDP’s speculation tax on empty homes

Negative-option billing is still legal for governments

May plans next move in Brexit fight as chances rise of delay

Some say a lack of action could trigger a ‘public tsunami’

Most Read