River levels throughout the interior have been high due to snowmelt and rainfall. The River Forecast Centre has predicted a high risk of flooding in this summer in many areas. (Black Press file photo)

How to safely drink water in areas impacted by flooding

Quality and safety of drinking water can be affected during and after floods

River levels remain high and flood alerts have been issued in many areas throughout the Interior, prompting Interior Health to issue a list of precautions regarding drinking water, as it can be affected during and after flooding events.

Part of being prepared includes being aware of water safety following local flooding.

READ MORE: Evacuation order and alerts issued for properties in Cawston area

If you are unsure of the safety of your water following a flood, Interior Health urges the use of an alternate source of water.

“Individuals with compromised immune systems and chronic illnesses, infants, or the elderly are at higher risk when the drinking water is affected. Floods may significantly increase risk to your health by introducing raw sewage, chemical contaminants, and debris into water sources,” reads a statement issued by Interior Health.

Interior Health encourages individuals living in areas affected by floods to follow these precautions:

  • Do not drink or use any water that has been contaminated with floodwaters. Do not swallow water while you are showering or bathing. Your drinking water sources may need to be treated and tested before consumption can resume.
  • For cleaning your dishes, rinse them for a minute in diluted bleach (one tablespoon of household bleach per gallon of tap water). If you are using a dishwasher, use the hot wash and dry cycle.
  • Many disease-causing microbial agents, such as E. coli may be present in water impacted by flooding. Wash your hands with soap after contact with floodwaters or handling items that have come into contact with floodwaters.

For more flood information, visit the Interior Health website or contact your nearest Environmental Public Health office.

READ MORE: High water levels on Shuswap Lake may close popular Canoe Beach

@PentictonNews
editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

flooding

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

Reflecting on former Kootenay MLA Ed Conroy’s legacy

Former BC cabinet minister and Kootenay MLA Ed Conroy passed away June 26

Conserving all-Canadian wildlife just one part of the puzzle

“Canada plays a critical role in protecting many of these plants and animals.”

Salmo RCMP arrest three, seize $15,000

The three adult men have been charged with “Conspiracy to Commit an Offence.”

COVID-19: Should non-medical masks be mandatory in Canada?

New poll shows Canadians are divided on the rules around mandatory masks

Rosslanders celebrate Canada Day in style

Locals organized a museum scavenger hunt, a Mt. Roberts flag-raising ceremony and evening fireworks

Police issue warning after baby comes across suspected drugs in Kamloops park

The 11-month-old girl’s mother posted photos on social media showing a small plastic bag containing a purple substance

Collision results in train derailment just east of Golden

The derailment occurred Sunday night, according to a statement from CP

Lower Mainland woman says llama farming neighbour shot her 11-month-old pup

Young dog was on owner’s Maple Ridge property when it was killed on June 21

B.C. records 31 new cases, six deaths over three days due to COVID-19

There are 166 active cases in B.C., 16 people in hospital

B.C. highway widening job reduced, costs still up $61 million

Union-only project scales back work to widen Trans-Canada

Greater Victoria nanny pleads guilty to child porn, sexual interference charges

Johnathon Lee Robichaud pleaded guilty to slew of sex crimes

Most Read