With the smoke cleared and the temperature cooling off, Sept. 4 felt like fall was in the air. Chase resident Al Mitchell enjoys a stroll with his four-legged friend Teddy who keeps up as he scooters along. Photo: Rick Koch

With the smoke cleared and the temperature cooling off, Sept. 4 felt like fall was in the air. Chase resident Al Mitchell enjoys a stroll with his four-legged friend Teddy who keeps up as he scooters along. Photo: Rick Koch

ICBC, police launch campaign to increase pedestrian safety

Pedestrians are among the most vulnerable road users in a crash

ICBC and police have launched a campaign to help protect pedestrians as weather conditions worsen and the risk of pedestrian crashes increases.

The B.C. insurer says that between October and January, pedestrian fatalities increase by an average of 54 per cent.

“That’s why ICBC and police are urging drivers and pedestrians to do their part to help prevent crashes,” the advisory reads.

Pedestrians are among the most vulnerable road users in a crash.

Distracted driving and failing to yield the right-of-way are the top contributing factors for drivers in crashes with pedestrians, with 80 per cent of crashes involving pedestrians happening at intersections.

Drivers should be ready to yield to pedestrians near crosswalks, transit stops and before turning at intersections.

Pedestrians can help stay safe by making eye contact with drivers, using designated crosswalks and watching for vehicles turning at intersections.

Both drivers and pedestrians should always avoid distractions and take extra time to scan their surroundings.

ICBC and community policing volunteers will be handing out reflectors and providing safety tips in high pedestrian traffic areas across the province to help pedestrians stay visible.

This year’s campaign reminds drivers: you see pedestrians when you really look for them.

“As weather conditions begin to shift and daylight hours decrease, drivers and pedestrians should use extra caution on the road,” says Lindsay Matthews, ICBC spokesperson.

Crashes involving pedestrians are highest between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. every day when many of us are commuting home, she adds.

“Whether you’re a pedestrian or a driver, always remember to scan your surroundings and avoid distractions. It’s important we all do our part to keep our roads safe.”

Statistics

In B.C., on average, 52 pedestrians are killed and more than 2,000 injured in crashes each year.​

In the Lower Mainland, on average, 1,600 pedestrians are injured in 1,800 crashes every year.

On Vancouver Island, on average, 260 pedestrians are injured in 300 crashes every year.

In the Southern Interior (which encompasses Greater Trail) on average, 170 pedestrians are injured in 200 crashes every year.

In the North Central region, on average, 62 pedestrians are injured in 68 crashes every year.

An average of 28 pedestrians are killed and 954 injured in crashes between October and January, compared to 11 pedestrians who are killed and 501 injured between May and August.

ICBC data based on five-year average from 2017 to 2021. Fatality data and contributing factors based on police data five-year average from 2016 to 2020. Crash data from 2020 and 2021 may be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

ICBCRCMP Briefs