The Reisig family – former residents of Aldergrove – are seeing the holidays in a whole new light after Matt miraculously recovered from the rare onset of a syndrome (Guillian-Barre) that paralyzed the 32-year-old father in March. (Submitted photo)

The Reisig family – former residents of Aldergrove – are seeing the holidays in a whole new light after Matt miraculously recovered from the rare onset of a syndrome (Guillian-Barre) that paralyzed the 32-year-old father in March. (Submitted photo)

‘I’m just happy to be alive’: Once-paralyzed B.C. father makes a full recovery

Matt Reisig recovers, celebrating a Christmas he once thought impossible

Aldergrove-born Matt Reisig is back at home, making holiday memories with his wife and one-year-old daughter Ayla this Christmas.

It’s something many, including Reisig himself, thought impossible after being paralyzed chest-down by Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) in late February.

Reisig was unable to breathe on his own, eat, and hug “daddy’s little girl” for months after first being rushed to Peace Arch Hospital, with what felt like the flu.

RELATED: Paralyzed young father’s condition now stabilizing

“It was tingling in my arms and legs,” Reisig described, “an overall weakness.”

Now, Reisig hopes to raise awareness about GBS – a mysterious inflammatory disorder where the immune system attacks its nerves instead of the virus the body is sick with, according to Muscular Dystrophy Canada.

There is no known cause for the condition.

Initially after falling ill, Reisig – a small-business owner and painter – remembers trying to push back client appointments one week, offering them a discount as an incentive for waiting.

But within seven days, on March 7, the 32-year-old father would be intubated and on life support.

“It’s still hard to talk about,” Reisig told the Aldergrove Star.

“I don’t want anyone else to go through what I went through.”

After the initial GBS diagnosis, the disorder sucked the “drive” out of him, along with the loss of his motor skills except for slight head, shoulder, and face movements including nods and eyelid twitches.

“I thought GBS had ruined my life,” Reisig told the Aldergrove Star.

Through it all, his wife Ashley stuck by his side at Surrey Memorial Hospital’s intensive care unit, managing to sleep nightly on a pull-out couch in his room.

“I would come home once every four days or so,” she explained. Even her mother, Ayla’s grandmother, relocated from Kamloops to care for the one-year-old full time.

Ayla was uncomfortable and scared seeing her dad incapacitated.

Ashley became Reisig’s main mode of communication, and ultimate source of hope.

She tuned-in to what her paralyzed husband was mouthing with his lips.

And for when she wasn’t in his room, Ashley made a whiteboard list of Reisig’s needs and feelings.

For instance: “I need… suction, a nurse, my wife. Or I feel cold, pain,” she said about the list. Reisig reacted to truths pointed out the only way he could, in minute movements.

“When Matt was at his worst, I was constantly telling him, ‘It’s going to be okay, I know it isn’t now but it will be’ and, ‘This will end. This isn’t forever’ and ‘You’re going to make it through this.’”

A turning point came after Reisig faced a week of especially painful nerve pain, but with extreme effort, moved his fingers. 

Unbeknownst to Reisig, Ashley had been posting regular status updates to her Facebook page, chronicling 147 days of her husband’s condition.

Soon the statuses became the only connection the patient had to the outside world.

Bedridden and defeated, “it got to the point where if Ashley wasn’t there I would ask others to read my update and the comments,” Resig retold.

When he managed to gain wrist and arm movement, he read through all the messages on his own and “had a good cry,” he said.

“You don’t really know how big your village is until you’re going through something.”

An online GoFundMe account for the family has raised over $20,000, which “got [them] through” living and medical expenses, and is still able to accept donations.

There are two days in hospital Reisig will always remember: his wedding anniversary and his first real meal – a reuben sandwich after months of feeding tubes turned-to liquids.

On the Reisigs’ fourth wedding anniversary, he asked his physiotherapist to help him sketch a heart on canvas with the words “I love you.”

The artwork that Resig said “looks like our daughter did it” now rests on their bedside table at home.

Throughout the five-month ordeal, Reisig said he lost a total of 45 pounds, all of which he has gained back, “and five pounds more,” he chuckled.

Undoubtedly, the most crucial part of Reisig’s recovery from GBS was “getting off the ventilator,” Ashley explained. “We would go down to the lowest level of it and then Matt would panic.

READ MORE: Aldergrove father fights for his life after flu turns paralyzing

“It was a mental switch that had to happen in him,” she said. After that occurred, within a week Reisig was breathing on his own, lungs strengthening from their use.

“I told myself I was going to walk again,” Reisig explained about his fight for life. And after 16 weeks in the hospital, he did just that.

Reisig returned home to South Surrey on July 24.

Since going public, Reisig has been able to connect with other victims of GBS, ones as young as 11 years old.

“One boy felt like he couldn’t connect with anyone because of what he went through,” Reisig said about a Calgary child who was diagnosed with GBS.

“He remembers screaming in his head like I did,” frustrated by the inability to move or communicate.

Ashley has also been sent hundreds of messages from people all over the world affected by the disease.

Christmas this year looks a lot different for the Reisigs, who before GBS, found the holidays a hectic time of obligation.

“I’m walking every day, hitting the gym… Ayla likes to lay on my chest and sit with me and watch TV,” Reisig beamed.

The Reisigs have dedicated time to visit with Santa and watch their daughter’s face light-up in wonder of the season.

“It’s all so surreal,” Ashley said.

Just Posted

Shoes and toys were placed by the altar at the Circle of Indigenous Nations of Castlegar Indigenous Peoples Day gathering on Monday. Photo: Betsy Kline
Castlegar Indigenous Peoples Day gathering focuses on remembering

Occasion was more somber than previous years

Manager Cora Muellner (left) and employee Rachel Ronson at Buddy’s Place in Nelson. Muellner is among local cannabis retailers welcoming changes to provincial regulations. Photo: Tyler Harper
Nelson cannabis retailers welcome provincial changes to delivery, hiring options

As of July 15, private retailers can deliver their products to your door

Waneta Manor is located on Laburnum Drive in Trail. Photo: Sheri Regnier
New elevator coming to Trail manor this summer, says head manager

The elevator in Waneta Manor has been out of commission since February

Greater Trail barrel racer Hunter Weishaupt will race for a coveted spot in the Calgary Stampede
West Kootenay barrel racer takes run at Stampede

Hunter Weishaupt is inviting sponsors to get on board in her quest to compete in Calgary Stampede

Refusals to wear masks had Trail police called to two separate scenes on Saturday. Photo: Waldemar Brandt on Unsplash
Trail police called to mask confrontations

The Province of BC has masks being mandatory indoors

A person stands in a tower on the perimeter of the Number 3 Detention Center in Dabancheng in western China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region on April 23, 2021. Human rights groups and Western nations led by the United States, Britain and Germany accused China of massive crimes against the Uyghur minority and demanded unimpeded access for U.N. experts at a virtual meeting on Wednesday, May 12, 2021 denounced by China as “politically motivated” and based on “lies.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Mark Schiefelbein
VIDEO: Trudeau demands truth from China about Uyghurs

PM says Canada has admitted broken Indigenous relationship, unlike China on Uyghurs

CELEBRATING INDIGENOUS PEOPLES DAY
Council members and witnesses from the Hupacasath First Nation, left, and Tseshaht First Nation, right, prepare to raise their respective flags in front of Port Alberni City Hall on Monday, June 21, 2021. The flags will permanently fly as part of the city’s reconciliation work. See more coverage from the flag raising ceremony on page A5. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
Vancouver Island First Nations flags to fly permanently at city hall

Addition of flags are one Port Alberni response to reconciliation

Kelowna Mayor Colin Basran, middle right, participates in a ribbon-cutting ceremony in honour of the launch of Kelowna’s plasma donor centre at Orchard Plaza Mall on June 22. From left to right: Canadian Blood Services’ business development manager Janna Pantella, Canadian Blood Services’ operational excellence manager Tyler Burke, Kelowna Mayor Colin Basran and Canadian Blood Services’ centre manager Janine Johns. (Aaron Hemens/Capital News)
B.C.’s first dedicated plasma donor centre opens in Kelowna

The Kelowna location is the third dedicated plasma donor to open in Canada

Children walk with their parents to Sherwood Park Elementary in North Vancouver for the first day back to school on Sept. 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Study reassures parents, teachers that COVID-19 infrequently shared at school

Federally funded study in Vancouver finds risk in the classroom and in the community identical

Conservative MP Kevin Waugh rises during Question Period in the House of Commons Tuesday April 13, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Single-game sports betting about to become legal in Canada

Senate passes bill to take sports gambling away from overseas agencies

Point Roberts is part of the mainland United States but not physically connected to it, to reach the community by land one must pass through Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Closed Canadian border leaves Point Roberts’ only grocery store on verge of closure

‘We’re Americans but we’re not attached to America. It’s easy to forget we’re here,’ says owner Ali Hayton

Robin Sanford and her fiance Simon Park were married in an impromptu ceremony at Abbotsford Regional Hospital on June 16. (Submitted photo)
Mom dies day after witnessing daughter’s hospital wedding in Abbotsford

Nurses help arrange impromptu ceremony in 3 hours for bride and groom

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson with Premier John Horgan after the budget speech Tuesday, April 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. home owner grant won’t be altered, despite expert advice

Tax break for residences worth up to $1.6 million too popular

B.C. conservation officer Sgt. Todd Hunter said a black bear is believed to have killed local livestock. (THE NEWS/files)
Black bear believed to have killed miniature donkey in Maple Ridge

Trap set for predator that has been killing livestock

Most Read