B.C. Attorney General David Eby has vowed to clean up the financial ‘dumpster fire’ that is ICBC. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

New drivers pay most for optional ICBC coverage, David Eby says

Basic insurance only up ‘about $200’ as rate overhaul takes effect

New drivers facing big ICBC insurance bills should shop around for private optional insurance, Attorney General David Eby says.

Eby was asked Thursday about reports of large increases being faced by young drivers since ICBC’s new rate structure took effect in September. He said the largest increase in basic insurance faced by a new driver is 12 per cent, or about $200 per year.

“I’ve heard a lot of concern in particular around young drivers,” Eby told reporters at the B.C. legislature. “Most of the concern focuses on the optional side, which is above and beyond what you need to legally drive in British Columbia – collision insurance, third-party liability. This is an area where the private sector also competes with ICBC.

“One of the things that I’ve suggested is that if the private insurers believe they provide more affordable insurance for British Columbians, especially inexperienced drivers, they should do so.”

RELATED: ICBC customers can calculate their rate online

RELATED: Horgan regrets higher rates for young drivers

Eby said he’s open to rate changes to make insurance more affordable, but the first priority is dealing with billion-dollar annual deficits at the Crown corporation. Capping minor injury awards, diverting smaller disputes from courts to an independent panel and restrictions on expert witnesses have been imposed to slow increasing court costs.

The other big problem for ICBC is rising accident rates, and the province has focused on distracted driving, particularly cell phone use. Intersection cameras in high-accident urban zones have also been overhauled to convert them to speed cameras, generating tickets by mail in addition to their earlier function of ticketing drivers who run red lights.

The changes are designed to bring down rates over time for all drivers, including young drivers, Eby said.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Proposal pending for ‘Jason Bay Field at Butler Park’

City Council ponders proposal for adding Trail baseball’s best to Butler Park

What you see …

If you have a recent photo to share with readers email (large or actual) to editor@trailtimes.ca

Market in Trail, Fall Tea in Rossland

Grapevine: Events in Trail for the week of Oct. 17 to Oct. 23

Kootenay grocer eliminates plastic bags at checkout

Only compostable and recycled trays are now used in the Ferraro Foods meat department

Inquest planned in death of Peter de Groot

It’s been five years since the Slocan man was shot by RCMP

Scheer, Trudeau, Singh haggle over potential minority government outcome

If you believe the polls, it appears the Liberals and Conservatives are neck-and-neck

Canucks beat Stanley Cup champs 4-3 in a shootout

Leivo nets winner, Vancouver dumps St. Louis for fourth straight win

‘The more you test, the more you find’: Beef recalls a sign of success, experts say

Despite appearances, experts say a recent rise in major recalls is not a sign of food supply problems

Two years later, City of Fernie remembers

Oct. 17, 2019 marks two years since the tragic ammonia leak at Fernie Memorial Arena

Japanese buyer expands wood pellet contract with B.C.’s Pinnacle

Mitsui and Co. increases contract with Interior energy producer

Cannings endorsed by David Suzuki

South Okanagan-West Kootenay NDP candidate loading up on endorsements

ELECTION 2019: Have Justin Trudeau’s Liberals really cut middle-class taxes?

Conservative Andrew Scheer vows to cut bottom bracket, NDP’s Jagmeet Singh targets wealth tax

B.C. RCMP officer suing the force for malicious prosecution

Cpl. Tammy Hollingsworth cleared of wrongdoing after misconduct hearing

Talk to your kids about vaping, B.C.’s top doctor says

B.C. health officials have discovered the first vaping-related illness in the province

Most Read