The leaves of poison ivy are coated in an oil that can cause a painful rash or fever to develop anywhere from 12 hours to two days after contact. Found across southern Canada, it prefers rocky areas and can spread quickly. Poison ivy can be identified by its three leaflets, which can have jagged or round edges, and it is most potent in the spring. (Source: www.theweathernetwork.com)

The leaves of poison ivy are coated in an oil that can cause a painful rash or fever to develop anywhere from 12 hours to two days after contact. Found across southern Canada, it prefers rocky areas and can spread quickly. Poison ivy can be identified by its three leaflets, which can have jagged or round edges, and it is most potent in the spring. (Source: www.theweathernetwork.com)

Poison ivy patch pulled from Trail park

The invasive plant was spotted by the city’s flower bed contractor last week

A few cases of poison ivy crop up in City of Trail parks each year.

This summer the invasive plant was found close to the spray park at Gyro Park.

Mark Stephens, grounds/roads superintendent, says the city’s flower bed contractor notified staff of the location of a small patch of poison ivy last week.

The area was cordoned off before the poison ivy was dug up and disposed of Wednesday.

The trademarks of this plant are solid green, pointed leaves that hang from the stem in groups of three.

Contact with the plant’s sticky oil called urushiol (“yoo-ROO-shee-all) can cause a red, itchy rash called allergic contact dermatitis.

Treatment varies depending upon severity, but can include calamine lotion and oral antihistamines to relieve itching in addition to soaking the area in cool water.

HealthlinkBC info here: Poison ivy, oak or sumac

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