Mabel Todd, 83, of the Nak’azdli First Nation, leads a group of family members and advocates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as they walk along the so-called Highway of Tears in Moricetown, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Mabel Todd, 83, of the Nak’azdli First Nation, leads a group of family members and advocates of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls as they walk along the so-called Highway of Tears in Moricetown, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Province, feds fund full cell service along ‘Highway of Tears’ following years of advocacy

A ‘critical milestone in helping prevent future tragedies’ after at least 10 Indigenous women murdered, missing along the route

The northern B.C. stretch of highway that’s become synonymous with the tragedy of missing and murdered Indigenous women will soon have improved cellular service.

On Wednesday (April 7) the province announced the $11.7-million plan to build 12 cellular towers and 252 kilometres of new coverage along Highway 16’s “Highway of Tears.”

It will ensure those in need along the 724-kilometre route between Prince George and Prince Rupert will be able to call for help.

It’s a problem that’s gone unaddressed for years after being a Highway of Tears Symposium report recommendation to enhance safety for Indigenous women and girls.

“Families and survivors have highlighted the connection between MMIWG and gaps in cellular service along Canadian highways,” said Carolyn Bennett, federal Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations.

READ MORE: Billboard along B.C.’s Highway of Tears remembers missing and murdered Indigenous women

Since 1969, at least 18 women have been murdered or reported missing along the highway, according to RCMP. Of them, 10 were Indigenous women or girls.

Improving cell service along Highway 16 was urged by a national inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, launched in 2015.

“It is a critical milestone in helping prevent future tragedies along this route,” said Lisa Beare, B.C.’s Minister of Citizens’ Services.

READ MORE: Killing spree still feeds unease in B.C.’s isolated north, one year later

Rogers will be given $4.5 million towards the cost of installing infrastructure for cellular coverage in remaining weak-signal areas between Prince Rupert and Smithers. The company plans to cover the rest, breaking ground this spring.

The project will also provide coverage for three rest areas along Highway 16 at Boulder Creek, Basalt Creek and Sanderson Point.

“We must continue to do everything in our power to prevent violence against Indigenous women and girls to ensure they are safe to travel anywhere in our province,” said director Barb Ward-Burkitt of the Prince George Native Friendship Centre.

The project’s slated completion is in fall 2022.

RELATED: Stories of loss, pain heard at missing and murdered Indigenous women inquiry



sarah.grochowski@bpdigital.ca

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