RDKB partners with BC Wildfire to clean up dead wood at Christina Lake Dog Park

BC Wildfire crews used the cleanup project as an opportunity for chainsaw training

The Regional District of Kootenay Boundary (RDKB) partnered with the BC Wildfire Service this week to remove dangerous trees and accumulated deadfall at Christina Lake Dog Park, located at the south end of Swanson Road.

Wildfire crews seized the chance to get some chainsaw training for this type of work in the bush.

Team members used the cleanup project to hone their manual falling and bucking skills for wildfire activity and to progress in the WorkSafeBC Faller Competency Program.

“I would like to thank Christina Lake Stewardship Society board members Randy Gniewotta and Gary Shaw for connecting us with the BC Wildfire Service,” said Paul Keys, manager of Grand Forks and District Facilities and Recreation.

“It has also been great to connect with James Ritco, Wildfire Technician in the Boundary Fire Zone for BC Wildfire Service. He really was instrumental in helping to bring this project to fruition.”

Ritco says this project was a great opportunity to safely increase training capacity while helping a local non-profit organization.

“We were excited when the Christina Lake Stewardship Society approached us to partner on this project,” said Ritco. “It’s a win-win for everyone involved.”

The bucked up logs wrangled by the BC Wildfire Service are stacked at the dog park and free to anyone for firewood. The RDKB is encouraging people to come pick up what they need, but no motorized vehicles are permitted past the parking lot.

The regional district serves more than 31,000 residents in eight incorporated municipalities and five unincorporated electoral areas.

The RDKB stretches across 8,200 square kilometres from Champion Lakes in the east all the way to Big White in the west. Services include recreation and culture, planning, building inspection, environmental programs, economic development and public safety services for fire and other emergencies.

“As chair of the Christina Lake Recreation Commission, I know all of our members are so pleased to see such a mutually beneficial project take place,” said Grace McGregor, Area C/Christina Lake director.

“Here in Christina Lake we love our dogs and we love our dog park more than ever during this pandemic when we need safe outdoor spaces to visit with our furry friends. Thanks to everyone who made this happen.”



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

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Adriana Burton of the B.C. Wildfire Service bucks up fallen trees at the Christina Lake Dog Park. (Jensen Edwards/Grand Forks Gazette)

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