Rossland Council updated on cost of fixing arena

It will cost $700,000+ to get job done

An update to city council on the aging Rossland Arena indicates that fixing the facility is going to come with a hefty price tag.

A report to council at its last meeting indicated that replacing the ice-making equipment in the facility and making necessary renovations and repairs to the building itself will cost taxpayers just under $700,000.

That’s nearly double estimates for the project in a report from last fall.

“This time [the estimate] includes installation and engineering,” says Mayor Kathy Moore, explaining the difference. “The other was just the cost of the piece of hardware itself. So we always knew it would be higher.”

The report from city administration giving more detail on the arena project costs was submitted at the Jan. 6 council meeting. Staff said the new estimate includes:

• Required engineering, design and tendering activities (approximately $33,800),

• Actual construction costs (approximately $601,000), and

• Project contingencies (at 10 per cent or $63,480).

However, the estimate isn’t the final bill. Council will get a better sense of — and vote on — the actual cost next month.

“Pricing submitted for completion of this work will be re-reviewed and brought forward to council sometime in February for formal approval due to the lead time of securing applicable components related to completing this project prior to the facility’s 2020/21 operating season,” the report states.

Council’s already started budgeting for the project. The report to council notes that the city’s draft 2020 budget for general arena capital upgrades/undertakings is $537,000 in 2020, and $150,000 for every year between 2021 and 2024.

However, the report to council also notes the estimate is a Class D estimate — the roughest outline of costs — so the final price tag could be even higher.

Staff is working under direction from council to look at replacing the chiller and condenser system for the arena, and adding the capability of having an off-season gym floor to expand the arena’s use.

That motion was made after a public consultation process found most Rosslanders want to keep ice in the arena and find new uses for the facility.

“Both units were installed in 1997 and are considered to be past their expected service life expectancy of 20 years,” says the report to council. “This capital project is also consistent with the future direction of the facility as previously discussed.”

Staff said pricing submitted for completion of this work will be re-reviewed and brought forward to council sometime in February for formal approval.

The decision to begin serious repairs to the arena comes after the facility has had “minimal capital upgrades over the past five to seven years,” the report says. “[T]he city has mainly focused on making it safe to the public and employees to operate and utilize for the short-term.”

The arena was originally built in 1952-53 and in 1955 the Rossland Curling Rink addition was completed. Since the original construction of the facility, numerous additional improvements have been made.

Council received the report as information.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Know a candidate for Trail-Warfield Citizen of the Year?

Nomination period for the annual award is open until April 9

Missing Slocan City man found dead

Douglas Morrison went missing in mid-January

Music and film in downtown Trail this weekend

Grapevine: Events in the Trail area from Feb. 20 to Feb. 26

City of Trail reviewing organizational structure

Brentwood Advisory Group awarded $69,000+ contract

Grand Forks company donates to emergency department campaign

Construction now underway at Kootenay Boundary Regional Hospital

Blair says RCMP have met Wet’suwet’en conditions, calls for end to blockades

The Wet’suwet’en’s hereditary chiefs oppose the Coastal GasLink project

Health officials confirm sixth COVID-19 case in B.C.

Woman remains in isolation as Fraser Health officials investigate

Study says flu vaccine protected most people during unusual influenza season

Test-negative method was pioneered by the BC Centre for Disease Control in 2004

Saskatchewan and B.C. reach championship round at Scotties

British Columbia’s Corryn Brown locked up the last berth in Pool B

B.C. lawyer, professor look to piloting a mental-health court

In November, Nova Scotia’s mental-health court program marked 10 years of existence

COLUMN: Not an expert on First Nations government structures? Then maybe you should calm down

Consider your knowledge about First Nations governance structures before getting really, really mad

Meet the Wet’suwet’en who want the Coastal GasLink pipeline

Supporters of the pipeline are upset only one side is being heard nationwide

One dead in multi-vehicle collision involving logging truck on northern B.C. highway

DriveBC says highway expected to remain closed until 8 p.m.

B.C. teacher gets 15-year ban after lying about having sex with just-graduated student

Teacher had been dishonest with the B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation

Most Read