The next step is to launch a pilot that aims to remove barriers to undertaking home retrofits by providing a “concierge service” to homeowners. Photo: Columbia Basin Trust

The next step is to launch a pilot that aims to remove barriers to undertaking home retrofits by providing a “concierge service” to homeowners. Photo: Columbia Basin Trust

Rossland receives climate resiliency grant

Trust provides more than $1.7M in funds to eight Basin municipalities

The City of Rossland received a Climate Resilience grant from Columbia Basin Trust to HELP homeowners reduce their carbon footprint.

A grant of $187,485 will go to the city’s Home Energy Leadership Program (HELP) first adopted in September, 2021 as part of the Community Energy Association’s (CEA) Game-Changer program.

The next step is to launch a pilot that aims to remove barriers to undertaking home retrofits by providing a “concierge service” to homeowners.

“This project will increase the ability of Basin residents to understand their options and access skilled expertise to undertake retrofit and clean-tech projects,” said Jessica Martin-Thompson, Climate Initiatives Specialist. “It will develop the skills and knowledge necessary for a climate-resilient and low-carbon future in the Columbia Basin.”

The Trust provided more than $1.7M in funds to eight Basin municipalities including a community electric car share project in Nelson, and a city-wide organics collection program in Kimberley.

The city has committed to be 100 per cent reliant on renewable energy by 2050, so the shift to cleaner energy, and reducing energy use while increasing the comfort of homes are a priority.

To facilitate this, the CEA is offering community workshops to highlight clean-energy and energy-efficiency options for residents. It is also hosting training opportunities for local tradespeople, contractors and post-secondary students to support growing interest for building retrofits.

The Community Energy Association has previously worked with Rossland on the city’s community energy and emissions plan, the Accelerate Kootenays electric vehicle program, a zero emissions vehicle visioning project, and adopting the plan to be 100 per cent Renewable Energy reliant by 2050.

The Mid-town project is also taking steps to reach Step Code 4 under the BC Building Code and potentially be Net-Zero Energy Ready. To achieve this energy standard, the building will use efficient mechanical and electrical systems, a highly insulated building envelope, high efficiency windows and LED lighting. EV charging stations also will be installed on site.

The city will look at the feasibility of installing a solar array to bring the project to net-zero.

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