Purple bridge lights signified International Literacy Day on Sept. 8 as well as Literacy Month in the City of Trail. (Carolyn Amantea photo)

September is ‘Literacy Month’ in Trail

Literacy means much more than reading and writing

Passersby on the Trail bridge may have noticed the coloured lights cast an iridescent shade of violet onto the Columbia River Saturday night.

The purple theme marked International Literacy Day, celebrated annually Sept. 8, as a day to reflect on the challenges, changes and improvements to literacy on the local front and around the world.

Purple bridge lights also showed Trail council’s declaration that all 30 days of September will represent “Literacy Month” in the city.

“Literacy is the key to opportunity for Canadians to increase their life changes and be successful in today’s modern world, as literacy is no long simply the ability to read and write,” the provincial proclamation reads.

And, as Carolyn Amantea from CBAL (Columbia Basin Alliance for Literacy) points out, “It is important for Trail to recognize September as Literacy Month, as it is an opportunity to promote our community-based resources and to highlight the importance of literacy for all.”

Related story here: Trust boosts literacy programs

Related story here: Trail Times helps raise literacy funds

Amantea works on the front line of literacy programs in the Trail area as Community Literacy Coordinator for CBAL.

“Columbia Basin Alliance for Literacy has a vision that local communities will be healthy, inclusive, and committed to literacy and learning as lifelong and life-wide activities,” she explained. “By joining the growing list of B.C. communities proclaiming September as Literacy Month, the City of Trail is demonstrating its support for the citizens of our community as well as for the organizations that provide opportunities for residents to access barrier-free programming.”

The Trail Times asked Amantea if, in her experience, certain barriers or obstacles to literacy still exist in Trail.

“Literacy impacts every aspect of modern life: health care, civic engagement, education, employment and the economy,” she replied. “While the majority of residents have adequate literacy skills, too many simply do not. Approximately 45 per cent of adults in British Columbia have some difficulty completing tasks related to daily living due to limited literacy skills. Literacy is not limited to reading and writing; numeracy and digital literacy are just as important for success at home, work and in the community.”

CBAL, a not-for-profit organization, helps address literacy barriers in 77 communities across southeast B.C. In Trail, the programs are run from an office located at 1160 Cedar Ave.

“Our mission is to promote literacy and lifelong learning,” Amantea said. “By educating the public about the importance of literacy and by supporting local community actions related to literacy.”

In the 2017-2018 program year, CBAL in the Greater Trail area (including Rossland, Fruitvale and the Beaver Valley) offered free literacy programs for children, families, adults and immigrants which saw approximately 450 adults and 560 children and youth in attendance.

Coming up next is Reach a Reader, a month-long initiative in October.

Story here: Reach a Reader

“We will be on the streets fundraising for our Books for Kids campaign,” said Amantea. “Which directly helps children in our community have access to quality books and free family literacy programs.”

For information about programs, volunteer opportunities, or making a donation, contact Carolyn Amantea at (250) 368-6770, or at trailcoordinator@cbal.org or visit the CBAL website at www.cbal.org .

 

Just Posted

Trail and area artists eligible for arts training grant

Grant to support learning for visual and performance artists

New affordable housing in the works for East Trail

The proposal involves tearing down the old McBride Manor house and building a “nine-plex”

Snow hosts available to help you explore the Rossland Range

Safe and responsible way to learn about Rossland Recreation Site

Support for Music Heals Program in Trail

The music therapy program for seniors runs in Columbia View Lodge

South Columbia SAR hoping season stays relatively quiet

Group has responded to four calls so far this winter

B.C. storm totals $37M in insured damages

The December storm wreaked havoc on B.C.’s south coast

B.C. chief says they didn’t give up rights for gas pipeline to be built

Hereditary chief: no elected band council or Crown authority has jurisdiction over Wet’suwet’en land

Condo rental bans may be on way out with B.C. empty home tax

Many exemptions to tax, but annual declarations required

UPDATE: B.C. boy, aunt missing for three days

The pair are missing from Kamloops

Daredevil changes game plan to jump broken White Rock pier

Brooke Colby tells council daredevil event would help boost waterfront business

Liberal bows out of byelection after singling out Jagmeet Singh’s race

Karen Wang says she made comments online that referenced Singh’s cultural background

Truck hauling compressed gas for ‘virtual pipeline’ crashes on B.C. highway

Driver charged and highway closed for nine hours - containers did not rupture

Canucks rookie Elias Pettersson ‘feeling good’ after knee injury

Pettersson said he wasn’t feeling any pain during Wednesday’s skate

Most Read