The First Presbyterian Church donated $2,500 to the Skool-Aid program, which will help purchase Chromebooks for lower income high school students. L-R: Shantha Martin and Esther Brown of the mission committee and Patricia Nutini of Holy Trinity Parish.<ins> Skool-Aid is a charitable program that helps students of lower income families buy their school supplies when their parents can’t spare the extra money. Started in 2010, Skool-Aid is a program of Holy Trinity Parish, and is funded through private and corporate donations, and various local non-profits and community organizations. </ins>
Photo: Submitted

The First Presbyterian Church donated $2,500 to the Skool-Aid program, which will help purchase Chromebooks for lower income high school students. L-R: Shantha Martin and Esther Brown of the mission committee and Patricia Nutini of Holy Trinity Parish. Skool-Aid is a charitable program that helps students of lower income families buy their school supplies when their parents can’t spare the extra money. Started in 2010, Skool-Aid is a program of Holy Trinity Parish, and is funded through private and corporate donations, and various local non-profits and community organizations. Photo: Submitted

Skool Aid supplies 40 Kootenay Columbia high school students with Chromebooks

This year is anything but typical.

In a typical year, Skool Aid volunteers help around 230 students living in a low-income bracket by supplying pencils, paper, and all the other school essentials they will need for the classroom.

But this year is anything but typical.

With the pandemic forcing less time in the physical classroom and more learning time in the “Google Classroom,” which is a digital education platform, essential school tools have evolved well beyond pen and paper.

Read more: Skool Aid helps get students off on the right foot

Read more: Skool Aid campaign helps take bite out of school costs

In particular, there’s a much greater need for a digital learning device called a “Chromebook” for students enrolled in grades 8 to 12 at the Trail high school.

So when a J.L. Crowe Secondary School counsellor asked Skool Aid if there was anyway they could help supply 40 Chromebooks to give – not loan – the high school’s low income students, the first thought the spearhead of this volunteer group had, was “ouch.”

But that first reaction was only momentary.

That’s because ever since Louise McEwan launched Skool Aid in the Catholic community of Trail back in 2010 to help 100-or-so low income families, she’s had faith that locals will always find a way to join hands and make sure the youngest members of the region have the supplies they need for the classroom.

And that includes Chromebooks, which are essentially a laptop. Through a Google account, the device provides access to Google Classroom, a free web service developed by Google for schools. The aim is to simplify the creation, distribution, and grading of assignments.

“Chromebooks are not something that would typically be on Skool Aid’s radar, we’ve always just focused on the basics,” McEwan told the Trail Times.

“This is the first time we’ve ventured beyond the basics, but these are extraordinary times.”

Skool Aid had already faced funding challenges for the usual school-year basics when COVID-19 quashed fundraising events for all those community groups that typically donate to the cause. Individual donations through Holy Trinity Parish also dried up when pandemic restrictions forced the church to close for several months.

When the group couldn’t meet its $10,000+ budget through community donations to buy the usual classroom supplies, Skool Aid was fortunate to cover a $3,000 shortfall through the Emergency Community Support Fund (Fund).

The federal government announced this $350M olive branch in May, as a means to help community organizations across Canada stay afloat. The Fund is delivered through intermediaries, those being the Canadian Red Cross, the United Way Centraide Canada, and Community Foundations of Canada.

“After I had done that, we had the request from the high school, from Loretta Jones, if we could fund Chromebooks,” McEwan continued.

“They had identified about 40 students from low income families who would benefit from having a Chromebook for their education.”

Not long after this request landed in McEwan’s hands, the mission committee from the First Presbyterian Church in downtown Trail came along with a donation of $2,500 to Skool Aid.

This was the first stream of money that would go toward the purchase of the digital devices.

Soon after, an opportunity surfaced to apply for funding through the Le Roi Community Foundation’s local grant cycle.

L-R: Le Roi foundation board member Barb Pistak presents a $8,048 donation to Louise McEwan and Patricia Nutini of Holy Trinity Parish’s Skool Aid program. The funds will be used to purchase Chromebooks for low income students at Crowe. <ins>As a member of Community Foundations Canada, the Le Roi Community Foundation (LCF), supports families and organizations seeking to leave lasting legacies in Rossland, Warfield, Trail, Montrose, Fruitvale and Areas A and B of the regional district. With a team of volunteers, the LCF reviews grant applications and makes decisions about fund disbursements. In 2020, the LCF disbursed a total of $127,000, which included grants supporting COVID-created needs (facilitated by the federal Emergency Community Support Fund and the Vancouver Foundation), scholarships and annual grants totaling $32,000, which included a grant for a Skool-Aid project run by Holy Trinity Parish. This grant will support getting Chromebooks into the hands of students from low-income families during a time when COVID-19 is putting greater demands for online learning. </ins> Photos: Submitted

L-R: Le Roi foundation board member Barb Pistak presents a $8,048 donation to Louise McEwan and Patricia Nutini of Holy Trinity Parish’s Skool Aid program. The funds will be used to purchase Chromebooks for low income students at Crowe. As a member of Community Foundations Canada, the Le Roi Community Foundation (LCF), supports families and organizations seeking to leave lasting legacies in Rossland, Warfield, Trail, Montrose, Fruitvale and Areas A and B of the regional district. With a team of volunteers, the LCF reviews grant applications and makes decisions about fund disbursements. In 2020, the LCF disbursed a total of $127,000, which included grants supporting COVID-created needs (facilitated by the federal Emergency Community Support Fund and the Vancouver Foundation), scholarships and annual grants totaling $32,000, which included a grant for a Skool-Aid project run by Holy Trinity Parish. This grant will support getting Chromebooks into the hands of students from low-income families during a time when COVID-19 is putting greater demands for online learning. Photos: Submitted

“Holy Trinity Parish put in for a grant as part of this regular grant cycle and we were awarded just over $8,000 to purchase the rest of the Chromebooks for these kids,” said McEwan.

“So we are going to be able to buy 40 Chromebooks for the high school kids from lower income families that will benefit them through their education. It was absolutely incredible.”

With this request met, McEwan is already thinking about next year’s students and how COVID will impact those needs.

“We will continue to monitor this and we’ll probably have to look at other ways to fund the Skool Aid program next year,” she shared. “But somehow it just always works out. I stress and worry and then it works out. The hand of God is in there somewhere for sure,” she said.

“And I think people in our area, maybe everywhere, but particularly in this area, are, for the most part, compassionate. They care about children and they care about education.”



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