The City of Trail plan will address energy transition to renewable sources of energy use in all community sectors including heating and cooling, transportation, electricity and waste management. Photo: Micah Hallahan/Unsplash

The City of Trail plan will address energy transition to renewable sources of energy use in all community sectors including heating and cooling, transportation, electricity and waste management. Photo: Micah Hallahan/Unsplash

Trail council green-lights 100 per cent renewable energy transition

“This is a very important step for Trail, and all communities,” says Mayor Lisa Pasin.

During the April 25 governance meeting, Trail city council unanimously voted to transition municipal operations to 100 per cent renewable energy no later than 2050.

Trail joins 12 other communities in the Kootenay region to commit to taking action on renewable energy usage, defined as energy that is collected from resources that are naturally replenished on a human timescale. It includes sources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves, and geothermal heat.

“This is a very important step for Trail, and all communities,” says Mayor Lisa Pasin. “As we experience the effects from extreme changes in our climate, learn more about the environmental and health benefits of renewable energy, and continue to build a strong and sustainable economy, we must evolve and commit to this transition.”

To help develop a transition plan over the next 12 months, council directed staff to collaborate with experts and residents, as well as consult the West Kootenay 100 per cent Renewable Energy Plan and collaborate with the regional local government working group.

The plan will address energy transition to renewable sources of energy use in all community sectors including heating and cooling, transportation, electricity and waste management.

“We are eager to engage and collaborate with renewable energy experts and the community over the next year,” says Pasin. “Once we identify our priorities, we can begin to incorporate the plans into the city’s strategic priorities.”

The West Kootenay EcoSociety presented to council in March about the opportunities to say “yes” to clean energy transition and collaborate with other local governments who developed the West Kootenay 100 per cent Renewable Energy Plan, released in 2020.

“It’s been a wonderful experience for our team to have over 1,000 conversations with Trail residents,” says Montana Burgess, executive director, West Kootenay EcoSociety. “People want to learn about real climate solutions. It’s already started in Trail, and residents want a 100 per cent renewable energy transition right here in their city.”

Trail joins with Golden, Creston, and Fruitvale, who also joined the 100 per cent renewable energy transition in 2021, and Castlegar, Kaslo, Nelson, New Denver, Silverton, Slocan, Rossland, Warfield and the Regional District of Central Kootenay who developed the West Kootenay 100 per cent Renewable Energy Plan, to work toward clean energy transition.

Window replacement

The governance committee considered a parks department report regarding proposals received for the replacement of windows at the Trail Memorial Centre. Staff noted that user group feedback informed that highway noise is disruptive to programs in the Victoria view room. Thus, bidders were asked to consider noise reduction options as part of their window specification. During the April 25 meeting, council awarded the respective contract to Hil-Tech Contracting Ltd. in the amount of $132,110 plus taxes. While Hil-Tech was not the lowest bid of three submissions, as per the contract, the company will install laminated inboard glass to reduce highway noise.

Delegation

Dino Dorazio, board chair, Rebecca Richards, director of the Lower Columbia Initiatives Corporation (LCIC) and Jacomien van Tonder, Director of Metal Tech Alley (MTA), presented council with an update on the organization’s activities. Dorazio introduced the current LCIC board members; van Tonder reported on recent initiatives of MTA including their work with the Battery Metals Association of Canada to develop a feasibility study to position Trail as a battery hub in Western Canada. Richards provided an overview of the 2022 First Quarter Report, outlining recent initiatives of the LCIC. Jan Morton, past president of the Lower Columbia Community Development Team Society was present to provide an overview of society activities being undertaken by the various sub-committees.

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