The Feb. 20 fundraiser for Getting to Home goes virtual-only in Trail. Participants can still plan their own walk using social distancing rules. Photo: Trail Times

The Feb. 20 fundraiser for Getting to Home goes virtual-only in Trail. Participants can still plan their own walk using social distancing rules. Photo: Trail Times

Trail ‘Getting to Home’ fundraiser goes virtual-only

Coldest Night of the Year event goes Saturday, Feb. 20

Locals can still raise money to help tackle the homeless problem in Greater Trail on Feb. 20 – all that’s changed for the Coldest Night of the Year (CNOY) event is the format.

Organizers have announced that the Trail fundraising event will be virtual-only.

Read more: Coldest Night of the Year fundraiser for homelessness in Greater Trail

Read more: Trail RCMP offer healing approach to mental illness and addictions

“The good news is: no specific action is required on your end,” the CNOY organizers clarified. “You can still fundraise in support of your local charity and walk in solidarity with your community’s hungry, hurting, and homeless on the night of Feb. 20, or any night of your choice in February.

“The walk will be a self-organized route that you can undertake solo, with your team, or with a small group of your choosing. Your location will be cheering you on virtually … We’re in this together – there’s a place for everyone!”

Money from the Trail event will be in support of Getting to Home, a frontline service that connects with homeless individuals, or those at-risk of becoming homeless, to help find them a place to live.

Image: CNOY.org

Image: CNOY.org

Frontline workers generally support up to 100 people each year.

The individuals they help are of all ages.

Reasons for homelessness are generally quite complex, but an obstacle for housing in the Trail area is the lack of affordable rental units.

Lack of affordable rental stock, of course, limits options.

“The variety of housing needs are not being met at this time,” says frontline worker Sheila Adcock, from Career Development Services. “Although we are working on exploring options and community needs, [the fact is] building new units does not work fast.”

Adcock says Getting to Home is in dire need of financial backing because past funding options are not available past March. And, of course, the pandemic has quashed annual fundraising initiatives that have helped keep this resource afloat.

“With the increasing need to have outreach workers out in the community assisting the most vulnerable, now is the time we are asking the community to come together to help,” she explained. “I know a lot of people are asking how they can become involved and support the most vulnerable citizens in the community and this is a great opportunity to feel good about being a part of the solution and encouraging others as well.”



newsroom@trailtimes.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

City of TrailfundraisingHomelessness