B.C. has some of the highest populations of black bears in the world with estimates ranging upwards of 120,000. Photo: WildSafeBC.com

B.C. has some of the highest populations of black bears in the world with estimates ranging upwards of 120,000. Photo: WildSafeBC.com

Trail RCMP: Impaired driver, bear vandal

Briefs from the Trail and Greater District RCMP

Trail police recently reported pulling a drunk driver off the road and they are reminding locals to lock their cars against thieves with two hands and bandits with four paws.

Impaired Driving

The night of Friday, Oct. 21, a frontline Trail and Greater District RCMP officer was conducting a routine patrol when he observed the driver of a Dodge pickup allegedly turn left through a red light onto Rossland Avenue from Highway 22 in Trail.

The officer detained the driver, a 35-year old Trail man, and his truck roadside for the motor vehicle infraction.

During this interaction, the officer suspected that the man’s ability to drive was impaired by alcohol, prompting an impaired driving investigation.

A demand was read to the man, who provided a sample of breath roadside that resulted in a warn. The driver was issued a three-day Immediate Roadside Prohibition.

“Trail RCMP will ramp up impaired driving enforcement in the approaching holiday season,” says Sgt. Mike Wicentowich.

Bear trashes SUV

The night of Sunday, Oct. 23, the Trail RCMP received a report from a Rossland resident that a bear had just trashed the inside of his wife’s 2006 Suzuki SUV in the 1500 block of Thompson Avenue, in Rossland. The bear managed to set off the airbags and car alarm during its rampage. The bear was scared away when the car alarm activated. Unfortunately, the vehicle sustained considerable damage to the interior during the interaction.

“Trail RCMP recommends that owners lock their vehicles to prevent this kind of conflict with local wildlife,” Wicentowich advises.

Black bears account for 14,000 to 25,000 calls per year to the Conservation Officer Service. Bears are most active from April to November, but in milder climates, or where they are continuously finding food, bears may not go into their dens. While most bear encounters result in the bear leaving an area, they can become more assertive or destructive when they have learned to associate humans and their activities with food. All bears that are aggressive in nature, or sightings in urban areas, should be reported to the Conservation Officer Service (1.877.952.7277). These reports can be viewed on WildSafeBC’s Wildlife Alert Reporting Program.

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