Legitimate breeders have well-established credibility and websites, not just a social media account, police advise. Photo: Unsplash

Legitimate breeders have well-established credibility and websites, not just a social media account, police advise. Photo: Unsplash

Trail RCMP warn of puppy scam after woman conned out of $1,900

Ask for references from other customers to ensure the breeder is legitimate and ethical

Trail police are warning locals of online puppy scams after a woman was bilked of $1,900 in an alleged fraud.

The RCMP report that the woman attempted to purchase a puppy through a social media website from the alleged seller.

She sent the money electronically using prepaid credit cards that she had purchased as requested by the seller.

The woman realized she was the victim of a fraud when after sending the money, she did not receive any further communication about her promised puppy. She alerted police in the early hours of Friday, Nov. 11.

“A puppy scam can cost an unsuspecting buyer thousands of dollars, such as in this case,” warns Sgt. Mike Wicentowich, Trail RCMP detachment commander. “Please take extra precaution when purchasing pets online.”

Tips to avoid becoming a victim:

Legitimate breeders normally have well-established credibility and websites, not just a social media account.

Websites usually list and show individual breeding dogs, not just pictures of puppies.

Purebred dogs must be registered by the breeder with the Canadian Kennel Club.

Ask for references from other customers to ensure the breeder is legitimate and ethical.

Never pay for the puppy before you see it in person. Typically you can visit the breeder’s place of business and view the animal before purchase.

Try not to fall into the trap of limited availability and rush to transfer money to secure your purchase.

Puppies are usually transferred to their new owners at eight weeks old and usually come with first shots and a clean bill of health from a veterinarian check.

Avoid shipping live animals. It is much more secure to pick up your puppy directly from the breeder.

Calling 911 not a game

The night of Friday, Nov. 11, police arrested a 60-year-old Trail man for causing a disturbance by screaming and yelling in the 1400 block of Bay Avenue, in downtown Trail.

An officer transported and lodged the man into the cellblock at the Trail detachment overnight. The next morning, an officer released and transported the man to the bus stop in downtown Trail.

During the transport, the man decided to call 911 from the back of the police car and reported on his police car ride to the emergency dispatch centre. The call was dispatched to the surprised officer as he drove the man to his requested destination.

The officer updated the dispatcher about what was occurring inside the police vehicle and to speak to the man about his inappropriate use of 911.

The man may face a charge or fine in regards to the incident.

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