An informative display on Parkinson’s disease is set up in the Trail Riverfront Centre library in recognition of Parkinson Awareness Month. More than 13,000 British Columbians have been diagnosed with this neurodegenerative, presently incurable, disease. Photos: Submitted

An informative display on Parkinson’s disease is set up in the Trail Riverfront Centre library in recognition of Parkinson Awareness Month. More than 13,000 British Columbians have been diagnosed with this neurodegenerative, presently incurable, disease. Photos: Submitted

Trail recognizes Parkinson Awareness Month

The bridge will be lit in magenta and teal lights on April 11 in recognition of World Parkinson Day

Over 100,000 Canadians are living with Parkinson’s disease today and approximately 6,600 new cases are diagnosed each year in Canada.

The City of Trail is recognizing this incurable neurodegenerative disease this month – April is Parkinson Awareness Month – with an informative display in the public library. As well, the Victoria Street Bridge will be illuminated in magenta and teal lights on April 11 in recognition of World Parkinson’s Day.

Anyone struggling with this diagnosis is encouraged to contact the Trail-Castlegar Parkinson Support group at 250.367.9235 (Patti) or 250.368.6864 (Barb). Photo: Submitted

Anyone struggling with this diagnosis is encouraged to contact the Trail-Castlegar Parkinson Support group at 250.367.9235 (Patti) or 250.368.6864 (Barb). Photo: Submitted

Anyone struggling with this diagnosis is encouraged to contact the Trail-Castlegar Parkinson Support group at 250.367.9235 (Patti) or 250.368.6864 (Barb). Due to COVID-19, in-person support meetings have been temporarily suspended.

Parkinson’s is a progressive disorder of the brain. Movement is normally controlled by dopamine, a chemical that carries signals between the nerves in the brain. When cells that normally produce dopamine die, Parkinson symptoms appear.

Bridge lights will be teal and magenta on April 11 to reflect World Parkinson’s Day in the City of Trail. Photo: Don Conway/City of Trail Facebook page

Bridge lights will be teal and magenta on April 11 to reflect World Parkinson’s Day in the City of Trail. Photo: Don Conway/City of Trail Facebook page

Most common symptoms include tremor, slowness and stiffness, impaired balance, and rigidity of muscles.

Fatigue, soft speech, problems with handwriting, stooped posture, and sleep disturbances may also present in the patient.

A diagnosis of Parkinson’s can take time.

A family doctor might notice it first. The patient will likely be referred to a neurologist, a specialist who deals with the condition.

There are no x-rays or tests to confirm the disease, so the neurologist will check medical histories, conduct a physical examination and order certain tests to rule out other conditions which may resemble Parkinson’s.

Currently there is no cure.

Symptoms and progression will vary person to person.

Certain medications are used to treat the disease, though various therapies such as physical, occupational, exercise and speech therapies often help manage the symptoms.

Read more: Remembering the C.S. Williams Clinic

Read more: City of Trail pockets fourth financial reporting award



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