Trail Times Year in Review: August

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This colourful crew of skateboarders got up bright and early to beat the heat at the Trail Sk8 Park Wednesday morning. The city is offering free skateboard coaching all summer long, courtesy of coaches Samantha Marina (right) and Owen Bartsch (Back middle) in orange.This colourful crew of skateboarders got up bright and early to beat the heat at the Trail Sk8 Park Wednesday morning. The city is offering free skateboard coaching all summer long, courtesy of coaches Samantha Marina (right) and Owen Bartsch (Back middle) in orange.
Kootenay Boundary Regional Fire and Rescue execute a rope rescue in downtown Trail on Sunday.Kootenay Boundary Regional Fire and Rescue execute a rope rescue in downtown Trail on Sunday.
L-R: The Trail Memorial Centre’s ice making crew consists of Levi Fotiou, Tanya Buckley and Dave Hesson.L-R: The Trail Memorial Centre’s ice making crew consists of Levi Fotiou, Tanya Buckley and Dave Hesson.
One of the work parties that helped removed 1,500 metres of wire fencing from the Pend D’Oreille Valley this year. of Photo: TWAOne of the work parties that helped removed 1,500 metres of wire fencing from the Pend D’Oreille Valley this year. of Photo: TWA

August 2022

— August starts with the city reminding locals that free skateboard coaching is available at the Trail skate park Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to noon.

— Consider hitting the road for a self-directed free-of-charge Columbia Basin Culture Tour starting Saturday, Aug. 6 and again on Sunday, Aug. 7. This year marks the 14th annual basin-wide culture tour with 84 locations collectively featuring the work of local artists and showcasing cultural and heritage sites.

— Trail council voted unanimously to provide a permission letter of support to Trail’s Incredible Farmers Market to give free access to the Trail Memorial Centre kitchen in exchange for funding upgrades to the facility. The letter was required for the market’s application to Agriculture Canada for a $100,000 grant that would create a hub for food production, processing, and preserves for market retailers.

— A total of 35 beds will be added to Interior Health’s substance use care services, which include 20 treatment beds, 14 transition and stabilization beds, and one new withdrawal management bed.

— Thursday afternoon, the Trail RCMP received a report of a break, enter, and theft at a business in the 7000 block of Highway 3B, in Trail. Thieves attempted to fill up a truck with diesel fuel stored on the property before fleeing. The catch is that their truck runs on gas. After filling the truck with diesel instead of gas, the vehicle quickly broke down. Police located the truck on Highway 22 only a short distance away.

— B.C.’s heatwave set multiple records across the province including daily records in Trail. On Friday, eight single-day records were set, including the City of Trail, which saw temperatures reach 40C, beating its 2014 mark of 39.6C. On Sunday, Trail set a new record of 39.6C, beating the old record of 39.4C set in 1929.

— Kootenay Boundary Regional Fire and Rescue was called to a dramatic rope rescue on the Esplanade in Trail on Sunday afternoon. A man had jumped off the Esplanade wall down to the river shore and sustained serious injuries.

— Greater Trail organizations are joining forces with Pride Trail to celebrate Pride 2022 at the farmers market on Saturday.

— Trail United Church originally said that it would not run a cooling centre this summer, but as temperatures increased the church opened its doors for another record-setting heat wave. Daily temperatures reached 40C in downtown Trail. During the 2021 heat dome, the church offered its basement for a cooling space, and provided bottles of water and food to more than 700 people in just over a month.

— A 73-year-old Castlegar man died at Redstone Resort golf course in Rossland after he was struck by a tree on Saturday. Family members have identified the victim as Robert (Bob) Archambault who is well know in the West Kootenay golfing community and for his many years of coaching local youth sports.

— After a two year pause due to the pandemic, Toadfest is back this summer at Summit Lake Provincial Park just outside of Nakusp. Each summer toadlets emerge from Summit Lake and migrate to higher ground across Highway 6.

— The Kootenay region is still lagging behind the rest of the province when it comes to unemployment and job recovery. Statistics Canada is reporting a 5.8 per cent unemployment rate for the region, compared to a 4.7 per cent unemployment rate for the province as a whole.

— Volunteers with the Trail Wildlife Association remove nearly 1,500 metres of wire fencing from the Pend d’Oreille Valley. For 30 years a barbed wire barrier has impeded wildlife movement through this critical corridor, and the sharp ended steel caused injury and/or entangled deer and other ungulates unable to clear the fence height. The youngest fence removers are in their 60s, and the oldest— Laurie Bursaw—is 90-years-old.

— Interior Health has declared a COVID-19 outbreak at Talarico Place in Castlegar, confirming 27 resident cases, and no deaths.

— Labatt Breweries of Canada has announced an investment of $4.6 million towards enhancements at the Creston location.

— A bewildered Trail resident recently filled up his diesel-run vehicle in Grand Forks and noticed a dramatic drop in the price compared to the fuel pumps in the Silver City. The lowest price for diesel in Grand Forks was 184.9 cents per litre with the highest price topping up at 190.9 cents. Meanwhile on the same day in Trail, the lowest price for diesel rings in at 207.9 and the highest rate rang in at 215.9 — a full 31 cents more per litre than in Grand Forks. The Times contacted Gas Buddy’s dependable field of experts who said the reasons could be a combination of many factors. “With wholesale prices on the way down, if one station in Grand Forks made the decision to drop diesel prices, the other stations nearby likely would have followed suit in order to not lose out on business,” said Gas Buddy representative Nicole Peterson. “The stations 100 km away in Trail would not have been subject to the same pressure, so stations there may remain at a higher price.”

— One person has died in connection with a COVID-19 outbreak at Talarico Place in Castlegar.

— 1,095 people in B.C. died of toxic drug overdoses between January and June of this year — the highest number ever recorded in the first six months of a calendar year. The latest data show that B.C. has surpassed 10,000 deaths since April 2016. The report shows 43 drug-related deaths the first six months of 2022 within Interior Health, 9 of those in the Kootenay Boundary. Of those 9, three of those deaths were in June.

— The Rolling Barrage Motorcycle Ride will be coming through Trail on Thursday, stopping at the Trail Legion, raising money and awareness for Canadian veterans.

— A large local contingent turned out at Trail council to address concerns over BC Housing’s request for an extension of the La Nina shelter. Currently there are 18 shelter beds in Trail. The request for a temporary extension is so that BC Housing can have time to find a long-term permanent location for the shelter operation and affordable housing.

— Trail Museum and Archives and Martin family unveil the mask of ‘61 Smoke Eaters World Champion goaltender Seth Martin’s homemade hockey mask. The museum acquired the rare find through an auction, and invited the Martin family and friends to an informal ceremony.

— Regional District of Kootenay Boundary is celebrating its newest addition to the Beaver Valley Family Park. Thanks to a $34,500 grant from the Columbia Basin Trust, a new pickleball court has replaced the aging basketball court at the Marsh Creek location just outside of Fruitvale.

— Warfield council is certainly getting the house in order after tackling two new bylaws for the books and updating several existing ones. First is the Village of Warfield Fire Works Bylaw 919. The village notes the goal of this bylaw, a first of its kind in the region, is to “reduce the risk of personal injury, noise and property damage from the use of fireworks and to minimize the impacts on pets and people.”

— Local landlord Donovan Brown is urging city residents to have their voices heard at the council table regarding a proposed three-year permit extension for the downtown temporary shelter.

— Sgt. Mike Wicentowich of the Trail and Greater District RCMP presented the 2022 Second Quarter (Q2) Crime Statistics to Trail city council. Total criminal code files in Q2 were down (380) compared to 2021 (394). Total calls for service from April through June this year were down (1,448) compared to 2021 (1,601).

— The first-ever Big Effort Swim at Christina Lake this past Saturday was a massive success. The Big Effort Swim is an open-water endurance swim event for charity and is the longest open-water swim event in Canada — a whopping 36-km swim to the north end of Christina Lake and back to Christina Lake Provincial Park in the south end.

— Another round of Columbia River Treaty talks has concluded between Canada and the United States, as efforts continue to modernize a decades-old water sharing agreement between the two countries.

— A suspected lightning strike and subsequent fire has rendered a Sunningdale house unliveable.The blaze started in the garage of the Portia Crescent home. There was extensive heat and smoke damage to the house, but no injuries.

— A COVID-19 outbreak has been declared at Kootenay Lake Hospital. Interior Health said Friday five patients on the third-floor medical unit were infected. It’s the second outbreak in less than a month at Nelson’s hospital. Among West Kootenay health areas, Trail leads the region with 89 per cent of people five and older having received at least one vaccine dose. That’s followed by Castlegar (83 per cent), Grand Forks (80), Nelson (79), Arrow Lakes (79), and Creston (74).

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